Back To Career News

How Do the Long-Term Unemployed Survive, When Benefits Stop?

Six weeks after the Emergency Unemployment Compensation program expired, Congress appears to be no closer to an agreement that would restore benefits to more than 1 million Americans whose regular unemployment has lapsed. A recent Washington Post article looks at some of the creative solutions some workers have cobbled together, to keep themselves afloat.

Six weeks after the Emergency Unemployment Compensation program expired, Congress appears to be no closer to an agreement that would restore benefits to more than 1 million Americans whose regular unemployment has lapsed. A recent Washington Post article looks at some of the creative solutions some workers have cobbled together, to keep themselves afloat.

unemployed 

(Photo Credit: jronaldlee/Flickr)

For example, Wessita McKinley of Capitol Heights, Maryland tells the Post that she has resorted to “legal hustling” to pay her bills, including data entry for small businesses, driving friends to appointments, and helping people fill out financial aid forms.

Do You Know What You're Worth?

“There’s no shame in my game,” McKinley says. “If you’re not creative in this economy, you’re going to be squashed.” Prior to the recession, McKinley earned a six-figure salary as a private contractor.

She’s not alone. Of the nearly 2 million people who have fallen off of unemployment in the past month and a half, only one-third are able to find other government programs, such as social security, to fill in the gaps. The others rely on support from friends or family.

A recent NBC News article cataloged several stories from workers who borrowed money from family members, just to stay afloat. One MBA borrowed $12,000 from his wife’s sister in order to make bare-minimum payments on things like health insurance and college tuition.

“I feel responsible for juggling every month and figuring out how the bills are going to get paid,” he says. “There’s just so many things to juggle and address … and spending as many hours as I can trying to find work.”

These stopgaps can only be temporary, while the long-term unemployed wait to see if their benefits will be restored. Congress is currently in recess until the end of February.

Tell Us What You Think

Have you ever had to survive without unemployment? We want to hear from you! Leave a comment or join the discussion on Twitter.

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
Read more from Jen

What Am I Worth?

What your skills are worth in the job market is constantly changing.