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The 5 Jobs That Ranked the Lowest for Job Meaning

Low-meaning jobs aren't necessarily low-satisfaction jobs. Sometimes, they even pay a good salary and/or have minimal stress. PayScale's latest data package The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs looks at all the things that can measure a "good" job -- however you define that term for your own life and career.

Low-meaning jobs aren’t necessarily low-satisfaction jobs. Sometimes, they even pay a good salary and/or have minimal stress. PayScale’s latest data package The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs looks at all the things that can measure a “good” job — however you define that term for your own life and career.

fry cook 

(Photo Credit: Seattle Municipal Archives/Flickr)

These jobs offer the lowest meaning of the 450-plus jobs on PayScale’s list, but at a variety of different salary ranges and levels of job satisfaction and stress.

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1. Gaming Supervisors

High Meaning: 22 percent

Salary: $45,000

Typical Education: Bachelors

High Satisfaction: 80 percent

High Stress: 72 percent

2. Fashion Designers

High Meaning: 22 percent

Salary: $51,200

Typical Education: Bachelors

High Satisfaction: 60 percent

High Stress: 74 percent

3. Cooks, Fast Food

High Meaning: 22 percent

Salary: $17,300

Typical Education: GED or High School Diploma

High Satisfaction: 45 percent

High Stress: 58 percent

4. Hosts & Hostesses, Restaurant, Lounge, Coffee Shop

High Meaning: 27 percent

Salary: $19,100

Typical Education: GED or High School Diploma

High Satisfaction: 64 percent

High Stress: 43 percent

5. Model Makers, Metal & Plastic

High Meaning: 27 percent

Salary: $51,900

Typical Education: Bachelors

High Satisfaction: 61 percent

High Stress: 59 percent

To see PayScale’s full list of 450+ jobs, and how each compares for job meaning, salary, stress, and satisfaction, go here.

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What’s more important to you when it comes to choosing a career: money or meaning? We want to hear from you! Leave a comment or join the discussion on Twitter.

Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
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