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6 Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Say, ‘I Quit!’

You desperately want to move out of your current job, but you don’t have a strong enough reason to justify it. You just very strongly feel it’s time to use your "I Quit" card. Before you take the plunge, hold onto that card just a while longer, as we help you through your decision.

You desperately want to move out of your current job, but you don’t have a strong enough reason to justify it. You just very strongly feel it’s time to use your “I Quit” card. Before you take the plunge, hold onto that card just a while longer, as we help you through your decision.

quit

(Photo Credit: Stuart Miles/freedigitalphotos.net)

Here are a few questions to ask yourself before making the big decision.

Do You Know What You're Worth?

  1. Are you building your skill-set/learning something new? If you are working on projects which have high visibility, high risk, and high value, the skills you are gaining through these projects could have tremendous value both within and outside the organization. Even if factors like low team cooperation or poor work flexibility bother you, maybe focusing on the project and gaining skills will offset your current displeasure on the job. If your experience is going to pay off in the long run, then maybe sticking with your job is an investment in your career.
  2. Does your manager know about your aspirations? You might expect your manager to discuss career aspirations and long-term goals with his team members, but sometimes things slip or get put off until later. Deciding for yourself “if I were good enough, I would have been promoted/chosen for the project” is not entirely fair. You owe it to yourself, the manager, and the organization to discuss your concerns and aspirations and seek input on how realistic they are. Sometimes, however uncomfortable, having an open discussion is an easier way to get to where you want to go before giving up completely. However, if after having repeated discussions and follow up conversations, your career seems to have reached a stalemate, that’s when you could start exploring options outside the organization.
  3. How does the job change look on your resume? Be patient with the time you can commit to the organization. Nothing happens overnight. Frequent job changes on a resume will not put you on the shortlist in the future, especially since you will not have the opportunity to justify your move at this first stage.
  4. Is it more than compensation? People seldom move for compensation alone, there are other triggers which affect the decision – a bad boss, poor work-life balance. etc. If your decision to move is purely monetary, evaluate your current status in your current organization and understand that you will need to start everything over in the new organization – building relationships, establishing your credibility, building your brand, getting seniority in the organization. Could you instead share your financial concerns with your manager? Is there a chance for a revision in the future?
  5. Can you find new opportunities within your organization? If you want to move to a different field or explore another area, try to see if you can get the opportunity within your organization first. It is more likely that your current organization, knowing your work, will be willing to move you to a new role and invest in your learning than a completely new organization, where you do not have any history at all.
  6. Can you risk uncertainty? Especially ask yourself this if the field you are in or the organization you are looking to join are at risk. Many companies have a “last in, first out” policy when there is a need to downsize. Evaluate your personal and financial liabilities and risk appetite before you make the decision to move.

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Padmaja Ganeshan Singh
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