Back To Career News

9 Questions You Should Be Asking in a Job Interview

There comes a time in every job interview where the hiring manager asks, "Do you have any questions for me?" Assuming you've done due diligence before the interview, you should know a little something about the company, the hiring manager, and the scope of the job before you show up. Here's how you can use this inevitable question to your advantage.

There comes a time in every job interview where the hiring manager asks, “Do you have any questions for me?” Assuming you’ve done due diligence before the interview, you should know a little something about the company, the hiring manager, and the scope of the job before you show up. Here’s how you can use this inevitable question to your advantage.

question

(Photo Credit: BamCorp/Flickr)

Do You Know What You're Worth?

Take the temperature of the interviewer and make sure they have no reservations about you.

Sometimes, you’ll get a strong feeling that you’re being seriously considered, but if they’ve got a great poker face, it’s a good idea to ask questions that help better define what they’re thinking:

  • “What skills and experiences would make an ideal candidate for this position?”
  • “Do you have any hesitations about me or my qualifications?”
  • “Could you give me an example of some challenges the person who takes on this role would face?”

Show you’re knowledgeable about the position and interested in the job. Ask questions that demonstrate you’ve really been listening during the interview. Make sure you don’t ask simple things that were listed in the initial job listing:

  • “Can you tell me about the person who previously held this position?”
  • “What does success in this role look like to you and how will it be measured?”

Make sure the company is the right fit for you. Don’t discount how much company culture can affect your job performance. Ask things that help you figure out if you’ll mesh well.

  • “Why did you join this company, and what keeps you here?”
  • “Can you tell me about the team I’ll be working with?”
  • “What are your favorite and least favorite things about working here?”
  • “Do you offer continuing education and professional training?”

And don’t forget to ask what the next steps are before you shake their hand goodbye. That last simple question can keep you from pulling your hair out and waiting by the phone for hours, days, or even weeks.

Tell Us What You Think

What questions do you think you should ask at the end of a job interview? We want to hear from you! Leave a comment or join the discussion on Twitter.


What Am I Worth?

What your skills are worth in the job market is constantly changing.