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The 4 Hardest Jobs to Keep

Although the unemployment rate (and maybe the economy in general) is improving, the change has been slow and somewhat inconsistent. The unemployment rate is different depending on the region or city in question, and varies quite dramatically by race, gender, and age, as well.

Although the unemployment rate (and maybe the economy in general) is improving, the change has been slow and somewhat inconsistent. The unemployment rate is different depending on the region or city in question, and varies quite dramatically by race, gender, and age, as well.

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(Photo Credit: Canadian Film Centre/Flickr)

Similarly, unemployment data reveals varied circumstances for different industries. Recently 24/7 Wall St reviewed 2014 unemployment rates provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics among workers in 564 occupations, ultimately compiling a list of occupations with the worst and best job security. Let’s take a look at today’s hardest jobs to keep.

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1. Actors (median hourly pay – $21.04).
Unemployment rate: 32.7 percent

Acting has always been a tough way to make a living. But, a nearly one-third unemployment rate still seems like a terribly high figure just the same. The trouble here is probably what it’s always been – there are far more people who want to work as actors than there are roles available for them. Additionally, one job doesn’t necessarily lead to another in this field. All of these factors help to explain the extremely high unemployment rate among actors.

2. Telemarketers (median hourly wage – $9.97).
Unemployment rate: 21.8 percent

Telemarketers earn relatively low wages in comparison with other incomes reviewed for this report (a common trend among these hardest jobs to keep), and earnings in the profession are generally closely tied to job performance. Similar to other professions with low job security, there is a lot of pressure that comes along with this work. Perhaps that pressure is a contributing fact to the job’s high unemployment rate.

3. Helpers, construction trades (median hourly wage – $13.42).
Unemployment rate: 20.2 percent

Although this profession is expected to grow in the years to come, (due to our country’s aging infrastructure, more work is anticipated in the near future), today, about one in five construction helpers is out of work. This industry is arguably more linked to the economy than other professions, and housing development, for example, has fallen dramatically when compared with a decade ago. These workers are still feeling the effects of economic changes, and their unemployment rate proves it.

4. Graders and sorters, agricultural products (median hourly wage – $10.10).
Unemployment rate: 17.9 percent

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics predictions, agricultural grader and sorter positions are likely to continue to decline in the years to come. Perhaps the work is changing, and workers are being replaced by technology that can work through tasks more quickly, or maybe the projection is due to an anticipated decline in agriculture generally. Whatever the case, it is predicted that workers in this profession can anticipate continued difficulties.

Check out the full list of hardest jobs to keep for more information. Or, see the complete list of occupations to see how your profession measures up.

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