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PayScale’s Salary Negotiation Guide: It’s Time to Get the Salary You Deserve

Seventy-five percent of people who ask for a raise get one, so why aren't you asking? If you're like many people, it's because you're afraid – 28 percent of respondents to PayScale's survey who didn't ask for more money said it was because they were uncomfortable negotiating salary, while 19 percent said they didn't want to be perceived as pushy. Eight percent were even scared they would lose their job. Most employers won't fire a worker for asking for a raise in a reasonable fashion, but knowing that might not help when you're in a panic. The best approach is to prepare for the salary negotiation discussion ahead of time, and make a plan – and PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide is here to help.

Seventy-five percent of people who ask for a raise get one, so why aren’t you asking? If you’re like many people, it’s because you’re afraid – 28 percent of respondents to PayScale’s survey who didn’t ask for more money said it was because they were uncomfortable negotiating salary, while 19 percent said they didn’t want to be perceived as pushy. Eight percent were even scared they would lose their job. Most employers won’t fire a worker for asking for a raise in a reasonable fashion, but knowing that might not help when you’re in a panic. The best approach is to prepare for the salary negotiation discussion ahead of time, and make a plan – and PayScale’s Salary Negotiation Guide is here to help.

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(Photo Credit: JD Hancock/Flickr)

The Salary Negotiation Guide is divided into three parts: Research, Strategize, and Negotiate. Start by taking PayScale’s Salary Survey, which will generate a free salary report showing how much others in your field are earning, based on experience, location, job title, and more. Then, use the Salary Negotiation Guide to make plan to use that information.

Do You Know What You're Worth?

Research: What You’re Worth and Why

When it comes to figuring out what to ask for, there’s a right way and a wrong way to set your price, so to speak. The wrong way is to think about how much extra money you’d like to have (or even need), or to swing to the opposite pole and try to guess how much money the boss is likely to give you without a fuss.

The right way to research your raise is to rely on data to determine what others in similar jobs are earning (see previous re: PayScale’s Salary Survey), and then to learn more about how salary negotiation works in general and at your company. Start by taking a look at articles like Negotiate Like An Economist: When to Ask for a Raise and 5 Things HR Wishes You Knew About Salary Negotiation.

Strategize: Hone Your Approach

The next step is to build your strategy. Maybe you’re an introvert, and need tips specially tailored to you; maybe you’re concerned about making the boss mad, and need to know how to negotiate nicely. Whatever your particular fear, there’s something for you in this section.

Negotiate: Get What You Deserve

Once you’ve done your research and prepared your strategy, it’s time to put it all into practice and get that raise. Here’s where you’ll find practical advice on making salary negotiation work for you, like these scripts to get the conversation started and advice on how to avoid common mistakes.

Remember: most people who ask for a raise, get one, and 44 percent get the whole amount they asked for. It’s in your best interests to make a plan and get cracking. You could earn yourself hundreds of thousands of dollars more over the course of your career – starting today.

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Jen Hubley Luckwaldt
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