5 Fast-Growing Flexible Jobs You Didn’t Know About

Some jobs lend themselves to flexible arrangements (like telecommuting, part-time, or temporary work) more than others. If you're a medical transcriptionist, a customer service representative, or a graphic designer, you probably already know that your occupation translates well to working from home, for example. But what about jobs that seemingly require a physical presence, whether it's in the classroom or the operating room? Don't be so fast to assume that working from home, on a full- or part-time basis, is out of the question. FlexJobs' latest list, 25 High-Potential Flexible Jobs for 2016, shows that many jobs provide opportunities to earn money while skipping the commute – at least some of the time.

The 5 Best Jobs for College Students

Attending college is astronomically expensive. Gone are the days when you could work part-time and over the summers, and come away with enough money to float your tuition and fees out-of-pocket. Still, even if you're paying for your education with loans and grants, extra money comes in handy when you're in school. The challenge is to find jobs that line your pockets without interfering with your studies. As part of PayScale's data report, The Best Jobs for You, we looked at a few of the best part-time jobs for people who don't yet have a degree, but are working toward one.

The 5 Best Jobs for Working Parents

Being a working parent was hard enough in the olden days, before mobile technology stretched office workers' days from 9 to 5 to 24/7. For many people who struggle to balance family commitments and professional responsibilities, even a workday that allowed them to leave the office and continue toiling online from home would be a refreshing change – but corporate cultures often demand face-time as well as productivity, leaving workers who'd like to see their kids out in the cold.

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.

Low Stress, High Pay? These 3 Low-Pressure Jobs Can Pay $70k or More per Year

It's common to think of stress and pay as a tradeoff. For example, surgeons and air traffic controllers pull down the big bucks because their work is not only beneficial to society, but potentially tough on the cortisol levels of the job-holder. We don't care how good you are at managing stress: if your job involves rebuilding the human body or landing several tons of steel and jet fuel, you're going to feel the pressure. But not every high-paying gig demands such sacrifices.

Top 10 Careers of the Future [infographic]

When you think about futuristic jobs, you probably think of something along the lines of robot scientist (which could mean either a scientist who builds robots, or a scientist who is a robot -- either might apply). But the real jobs of the future probably look a bit more familiar.

5 Jobs That Pay Well, But May Not Be Fulfilling

Some jobs don’t offer warm fuzzies, but they do give you a fat paycheck. If having that comfortable income is a priority for you, and you can find meaning in other aspects of your life, then here are some careers you might want to consider.

20 of the Happiest Jobs for New Grads

In a tight job market and uncertain economic times, new graduates are often grateful for any job, whether it's one they enjoy or not. In order to help grads find a career they'll love, folks at CareerBliss, a site focused on searches and reviews of companies known for employee satisfaction, created a list of the happiest jobs for the class of 2014.

Young Bankers Are Very Unhappy, and Here’s Why

Unless you're in finance, you probably can't imagine being excited to hear that you get one whole day a week off. But that's the position employees of Goldman Sachs and Bank of America Merrill Lynch found themselves in recently, when their companies unveiled new policies that would require them to take off four days a month. Bankers, especially junior employees, regularly work over 100 hours a week. But that's only one reason they're miserable.

Bankers Are Being Forced to Take a Day Off (and Here’s Why You Should Care)

Many bankers and other finance workers regularly put in 120-hour weeks. But all that might be about to change, thanks to new polices at Goldman Sachs and Bank of America Merrill Lynch, which force associates to take at least one day off a week (or four weekend days off a month, depending). Given that most of us aren't pulling down finance-sector money, why would we care? Think of those junior bankers as canaries in the coal mine of our work-life balance.