4 Legal Decisions That Fell on the Side of Workers in 2015

Some of the legal decisions that were made in 2015 didn't do much to help workers. For example, Wisconsin was added to the list of Right-to-Work states this year. Many feel that these laws, which change how unions collect fees from the workers they represent, hurt unions and the middle class. In other disappointing news, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Integrity Staffing Solutions vs. Busk case, mandating that companies are not required to compensate workers for the time they spend in security-screening at the end of their shifts – or for any task that's not an "integral and indispensable" part of their job, for that matter. But thankfully, the legal news for workers wasn't all bad this past year. So, let's focus on the good, shall we?

Why Unions Need Saving, and Why Millennials Might Be the Best Ones to Do It

Labor unions have a long history in this country of protecting workers. Unions protect workers' collective bargaining powers and help them negotiate better wages, hours, benefits, job security, and working conditions. However, these days unions are in jeopardy, and it turns out that millennials could be the ones to save them. Let's take a closer look at this issue, beginning by examining some of the reasons why unions are in trouble.

Why Unions Need Saving, and Why Millennials Might Be the Best Ones to Do It

Labor unions have a long history in this country of protecting workers. Unions protect workers' collective bargaining powers and help them negotiate better wages, hours, benefits, job security, and working conditions. However, these days unions are in jeopardy, and it turns out that millennials could be the ones to save them. Let's take a closer look at this issue, beginning by examining some of the reasons why unions are in trouble.

Could Salary Transparency Close the Gender Wage Gap?

Little by little, cultural taboos in the U.S. are being eradicated. With each passing generation, we grow increasingly comfortable with discussions that would have stunned those who came before us. However, there is one remaining taboo in our society that is going just as strong as ever: money. We don't talk about money, not with our friends, often not even with our families. And, sharing our salaries with our co-workers? Well, that feels completely out of the question. But, there might be something to gain from talking about pay with our colleagues and getting a little honest with each other.

Does the Boss’s Gender Change How Men Negotiate Salary?

Salary negotiation is important. The salary you command at the start of a new job impacts your pay for the remainder of your time with the company, and possibly beyond. Over time, not negotiating can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost pay. Furthermore, people who ask for raises earn more than those who don't. We know that women are less likely to negotiate than men, but gender can also impact negotiation from the other side of the table. Recent research suggests that men negotiate differently when their boss is a woman.

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Your 401(k)

In the United States, 401(k) is a retirement savings plan provided by the employer. The plan provides employees with the option to defer a percentage of pay toward their retirement account, to be withdrawn at a later time. Retirement plans like these can be a major perk, especially if the company matches some of the employee's contributions. Here's how to get the most out of your 401(k).

NBA Asks Men to ‘Lean In Together’

The NBA, alongside the WNBA and LeanIn.org, recently released a new PSA. Featured big names, such as LeBron James and Dwayne Wade, speak about how they support the women in their lives. "When men lean in, everyone wins," the announcement declares.

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.

Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?

If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.