The 10 Best Jobs for 2016 Are Mostly in Healthcare

What makes a job good? According to U.S. News and World Report, which just put out its list of The 100 Best Jobs for 2016, it's a mixture of factors like salary, occupational outlook, and work-life balance. There's also, as the editors point in out in the methodology, the all-important personal preference. That last factor is important, if impossible to weight: there's no point in contemplating a career change to a job you'll hate, no matter how many openings there are or what kind of salary you can expect to pull down once you make the transition. That said, one thing immediately becomes clear perusing U.S. News's list: if you want one of the top-ranked jobs, it will help if you're interested in entering a healthcare profession.

5 Fast-Growing Flexible Jobs You Didn’t Know About

Some jobs lend themselves to flexible arrangements (like telecommuting, part-time, or temporary work) more than others. If you're a medical transcriptionist, a customer service representative, or a graphic designer, you probably already know that your occupation translates well to working from home, for example. But what about jobs that seemingly require a physical presence, whether it's in the classroom or the operating room? Don't be so fast to assume that working from home, on a full- or part-time basis, is out of the question. FlexJobs' latest list, 25 High-Potential Flexible Jobs for 2016, shows that many jobs provide opportunities to earn money while skipping the commute – at least some of the time.

These Are the 10 Most Meaningful College Majors

Salary is important; no matter how much you love your job, you're probably not going to be happy if you're stressed about paying the bills. Beyond a certain point, however, more money doesn't necessarily equal more happiness. For this reason, it's a good idea for entering college students to consider meaning as well as money when choosing a major.

#College2Career: Kelly Eagen on Why College Major Isn’t Career Destiny

Choosing a major is invested with a mythic kind of importance, as if it were the first step on the path to inevitable career success or failure. But, if that were the case, every pre-law student student would go on to be a lawyer, and every English major would either write the Great American Novel or go on to live, penniless, in a garret. The actual truth is that while choice of major is important, it's not the end-all, be-all of career prep during college. PayScale's College Salary Report offers the information prospective students need to pick the right major, program, and school for their particular goals and needs; stories like this one offer perspective on how to use that information.

The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs

Does your job make the world a better place? Some professions are more likely to answer "yes" to that question than others – and which ones might surprise you. PayScale's report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations have high meaning, and which make workers feel like their job is hurting the world more than helping. If you're thinking about changing careers, or just want to see how your job stacks up, this report is for you.

The 5 Best Jobs for College Students

Attending college is astronomically expensive. Gone are the days when you could work part-time and over the summers, and come away with enough money to float your tuition and fees out-of-pocket. Still, even if you're paying for your education with loans and grants, extra money comes in handy when you're in school. The challenge is to find jobs that line your pockets without interfering with your studies. As part of PayScale's data report, The Best Jobs for You, we looked at a few of the best part-time jobs for people who don't yet have a degree, but are working toward one.

The 5 Best Jobs for Working Parents

Being a working parent was hard enough in the olden days, before mobile technology stretched office workers' days from 9 to 5 to 24/7. For many people who struggle to balance family commitments and professional responsibilities, even a workday that allowed them to leave the office and continue toiling online from home would be a refreshing change – but corporate cultures often demand face-time as well as productivity, leaving workers who'd like to see their kids out in the cold.

The 5 Best Jobs for Do-Gooders

First things first: not everyone needs saving the world to be part of their job description, and that's 100 percent OK. For some people, giving back happens on the weekends, or after work, and the office is just the place where they earn a paycheck. For others, however, no job could be truly rewarding – well-compensated or not – without the feeling that the work they do helps others. As part of PayScale's data package, Best Jobs for You, we included a special section just for these folks.

Interactive Map: What’s the Most Common Uncommon Job in Your State?

The most popular jobs in a given geographic area are usually pretty unsurprising, including titles like cashier, waitstaff, and customer service representative. It's not that there's anything wrong with these jobs; it's just that their very commonness means that you're used to hearing about them. But, what about the unusual jobs that are more common in one place than another – the helicopter pilots and professional gardeners and amusement park attendants? Those are the gigs PayScale looked at in a section of its latest data package on the best jobs for you. If you want a job that's common where you live, but uncommon anywhere else, start with this map.