4 Ways to Change Your Career for the Better in 2016

Time to make those New Year's resolutions! How are you going to make the coming year great for you and your career? We have some tips to help you make big changes by setting totally attainable goals. Before one year ends, get your game plan set for the next (great) year for your career.

The Top 5 Dangerous Jobs in the US

You might think that jobs involving training animals, working on highways, or fighting crime might be the most dangerous of all, but it's not true. A recent Forbes article sifted through 2014 data just released from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. It ranked the top jobs in America for job-related fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers. Here's a breakdown of the five most dangerous jobs you may or may not want to work.

Why Pay Transparency Is a Good Thing

Would you feel better about your less-than-market salary if your boss talked to you about how the company structures pay? Maybe. PayScale survey data from 71,000 U.S. employees show that workers who are paid less than the market rate for their jobs were more satisfied if their employer was transparent about their pay, as this Bloomberg Business piece points out. When someone actually sat down with workers and talked to them about compensation, their job satisfaction numbers more than doubled, rising from 40 percent to 82 percent.

Another Reason to Avoid Giving Your Salary History: The Gender Wage Gap

When negotiating a job offer, it's best to avoid giving your salary history to your prospective employer. Revealing your previous earnings could get in the way of landing that big pay bump you're hoping for. Also, there is another reason to consider not giving your salary history – the gender wage gap. For women, revealing previous salaries might reinforce future low earnings. Here are a few important things for women to keep in mind when navigating salary negotiations.

The 5 Least Recommended Jobs, According to PayScale Users

Some people are eager to recommend their job to others. They can talk for hours about the excitement and fulfillment their work brings to their lives, and they often go on and on about how much they enjoy what they do. While others – well, not so much….

The 5 Most Recommended Jobs, According to PayScale Users

Here at PayScale, we love data. But, much more than that, we love sharing meaningful, valuable data with our readers. We're always trying to find information that helps folks make the best decisions about their careers and professional lives. As part of PayScale's recent data package, Best Jobs for You, we looked at the jobs most recommended by people who took PayScale's Salary Survey. If you're looking for a career change, this is the place to start.

Good News for College Grads: More Real Jobs

Wondering about whether to go back to school to finish (or start) your bachelor's degree? You might not have to worry quite as much about whether you'll have a job after graduation, at least compared to grads from the past few years. The latest research shows that full-time, permanent jobs for college graduates are on the rise.

Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick

Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.