Diversity Talk Makes White Men Anxious, and Other Reasons Diversity Programs Fail

Diversity in the workplace has been proven to foster innovation and creativity and improve recruitment and retention, and diverse teams are better at solving problems than teams that aren't diverse. Despite all of this, a lot of companies aren't diversifying the way evidence would suggest that they should. Women in the Workplace, a joint study from LeanIn.org and McKinsey, found that women are underrepresented in senior leadership, and a 2014 analysis from Russell Reynolds found that more than 84 percent of board seats in the Fortune 250 are held by people who identify as white. Why aren't companies more diverse, given all we know about diversity's benefits?

7 Interview Questions That Get at What Really Matters

Eliciting meaningful and sincere responses from prospective reports during the interview process can be a lot harder than in looks, especially when you're a new manager and haven't done it before. It can be all too easy for candidates to misrepresent themselves to some extent during the hiring process. Some questions are better than others for keeping it real and getting at what really matters. So, if you're a new manager and hiring for the first time, here's what to ask to get real answers, instead of just fluff.

More Tech Companies Cast a Net for Diversity Leaders

A new wave of tech companies has started to publicly prioritize diversity by giving it its own job title. Many of tech's big guns, including Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, Apple, and Google already consider diversity efforts worthy of an in-house point person, according to HR Dive.

Your Personality Type Might Affect Your Chances of Getting the Job

If you've ever been asked to take a personality test as a part of a job application process, you know the strange pressure and confusion it can call up. After all, shouldn't our resume and interview tell our prospective employers everything they need to know about whether or not we're right for the position? These tests make us try to figure out which qualities (and which answers) the hiring team is looking for – and they can leave us wondering if we've hit the mark. Here are a few things you should know about personality tests and the hiring process.

Elevated Careers: eHarmony for Job Seekers

Online dating services have been around for quite a while now. The most popular, Match.com, launched 20 years ago (if you can believe it) and during those years, the public perception of this kind of resource has really shifted. These days, plenty of singles are grateful for the help, and many folks (one in 20 adults) report having met their current partner online.

4 Things Educators Should Know About Teacher Shortages

Education is a field that's ever-changing, as most teachers are no doubt aware. You have to be mighty flexible to be a teacher, rolling with the punches of curriculum changes, priority shifts, and societal/cultural evolutions that make your job feel brand-new each every year. (Sometimes, each and every day.) So, what's new in 2015? Well, teacher shortages, for one thing. Let's take a look at a few points educators should be aware of about this school year's job market.

7 Killer Interview Questions Managers Should Ask Prospective Hires ?

Forty-six percent of new hires don't last longer than 18 months, primarily due to "poor interpersonal skills," according to a study by leadership training company Leadership IQ, despite the fact that candidates are arguably more qualified than ever before. Certainly, they're more educated: 873,000 Americans are projected to earn master's degree in 2016/17 (a more than 50 percent rise since 1997), according to the U.S. Department of Education. The bottom line is that a candidate's resume isn't the only — and at times not even the most important — predictor for staying power or long-term success.

The Worst Cases of Resume Fakery Hiring Managers Have Ever Seen

In this job market, a lot of people might feel tempted to exaggerate their experience or credentials on their resumes in order to get ahead. But, lying on your resume is a bad idea – a very bad idea. You'll likely get caught, as hiring managers will seek to verify your claims. Even if by some miracle your lie slips past them, you'll reveal the truth when you start to do the job and your skill set doesn't line up the way it should. No matter how you cut it, outright lying on your resume is not recommended – but that doesn't stop people from trying.

Your Cover Letter Might Be Costing You the Job

Composing cover letters may be one of the most arduous aspects of applying for work, but it seems that they remain a necessary evil. The purpose of the cover letter is to introduce yourself to an organization in the context of the specific job to which you're applying. Cover letters are pointedly aimed toward each potential opportunity, whereas the rest of your application package might be similar to what you use for other job openings. A cover letter can make or break your application, so it's important to avoid certain common pitfalls in order to maximize its benefits.

Incredible Company Perks: Top 3 Cash Rewards

As PayScale has reported in the past, the crazy perks that employers sometimes offer to lure potential hires or satisfy existing ones can be unusual and/or extremely valuable. While it goes without saying that you'd be hard-pressed to find an employee willing to work without monetary compensation — it's called a "job" for a reason, after all — some companies have advanced the ever-escalating incentives competition even further by offering cash-based benefits on top of existing salaries or wages. From hiring bounties and quitting bonuses, a staff liquor fund, and even a budget to overcome your fears (seriously), here's a list of the top cash-based incentives that employers have implemented in order to stay competitive in attracting quality talent.