Salary Factors: Here’s How Your Employer Decides How Much You Get Paid

What goes into determining how much money you make? In most organizations, salaries are determined by mapping roles and job descriptions with similar organizations (competitors) through a third-party compensation and benchmarking service. A typical job is broken down into its responsibilities, criticality, complexity, and market availability to name a few crucial factors. Based on these factors, the range for a job is arrived upon.

Ask4More: 5 Salary Negotiation Tips for Working Women

Get your negotiation hats on, ladies, and let's narrow that gender wage gap together. Here are five tips to help you negotiate a fair and equal wage that you definitely deserve … unless, of course, you're satisfied with making roughly 20 percent less than a man for no good reason. Yeah, we didn't think so, either.

3 Things You Can Negotiate Besides Money

Deserve more money? The first step is negotiating a higher salary, either after receiving a new job offer or during the annual review. However, sometimes employers can't pay more. This does not mean that they can't afford to help by offering a better benefits package. Benefits packages are more than healthcare and a retirement plan; be creative and ask for what you want.

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.

#FairPayMatters: What the World Needs to Learn From the Sony vs Charlize Theron Fiasco

If anything good came out of the Sony email hack, it's that Charlize Theron put Sony on blast for paying her $10 million less than her male co-star, Chris Hemsworth, for their upcoming film, The Huntsman. Let’s take a look at how Theron’s ballsy move (pun very much intended) is encouraging women to quit the coy act and fight for their right to earn equal pay in their careers.

University President Shares Salary With School’s Lowest Paid Workers

It’s not everyday that a college president decides to take a $90,000 pay cut for the benefit of low-wage workers. Last week however, Raymond Burse, interim president of Kentucky State University, did just that. His decision sets a new precedent amongst presidents and CEOs to raise the bar on livable wages for employees.

Are Prevailing Wage Laws Discriminatory?

If you work as a contractor on projects with federal funding, prevailing wage laws may be pertinent to your rate of pay. An opinion piece published in the Albuqurque Journal makes the argument that "prevailing wage" laws are discriminatory. Understand what these laws say and how they affect you.

Forget About Wages, It’s About Pay Ratios

Anyone who has ever had a boss plead poverty as an excuse for not giving raises, or even paying living wages, needs to read this article. The United States of America has no regulations regarding the difference between lowest and highest paid employees and CEOs of companies. That means people who pay minimum wages with no benefits to workers are free to set six figure take-home salaries for themselves, and it happens all too often. The fight to reverse this growing gap is starting.