Liberal Arts Proponents Fight Back Against the Haters

The number of graduates majoring in the humanities and social sciences in the U.S. has declined in recent years, and liberal arts institutions are making a concerted effort to change the perception that humanities and social science degrees cannot lead to profitable careers.

Salary Factors: Here’s How Your Employer Decides How Much You Get Paid

What goes into determining how much money you make? In most organizations, salaries are determined by mapping roles and job descriptions with similar organizations (competitors) through a third-party compensation and benchmarking service. A typical job is broken down into its responsibilities, criticality, complexity, and market availability to name a few crucial factors. Based on these factors, the range for a job is arrived upon.

Meet the YouTube Millionaires

Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.

#FairPayMatters: What the World Needs to Learn From the Sony vs Charlize Theron Fiasco

If anything good came out of the Sony email hack, it's that Charlize Theron put Sony on blast for paying her $10 million less than her male co-star, Chris Hemsworth, for their upcoming film, The Huntsman. Let’s take a look at how Theron’s ballsy move (pun very much intended) is encouraging women to quit the coy act and fight for their right to earn equal pay in their careers.

Will You Change Careers in 2015?

You know the saying: "A new year. A new you." Why not apply that to your career, too? If you're looking for a career change in the new year, then you might want to check out the top occupations the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects as the most promising, broken down by highest paying, fastest growing, and most new availabilities.

How to Negotiate a Raise in 2015

Why is it so scary to ask for what you deserve, especially when it involves a dollar amount? For one thing, we live in a society where talking about money is considered tacky, as is blowing your own horn. To get the salary that's appropriate for our experience, skills, and capabilities, you need to get comfortable doing both. PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide helps you feel more secure asking for a raise or establishing your starting pay by breaking the process into three parts: research, strategy, and negotiating.

7 Tips to Help You Get That Raise

While some may advise leaving salary up to karma, we think that salary should reflect performance, skills, experience, and your company’s compensation philosophy. Whether you’re a man or woman, it is important to understand your worth and consider factors that influence your magic number, before you make your case for a salary increase.

7 Tactics to Avoid the ‘Overqualified’ Blues

Until now, you may have believed that it was a good thing to have lots of skills and an over-abundance of job experience. After all, you've worked hard over the years to build that portfolio and to earn every line on your resume. In the sometimes-backwards world of the job hunt, that gold-plated resume may actually be sending up red flags to your prospective employer.