Find an Inspirational Female Mentor With This Roadmap

Let's start by taking a little timehop back to our grandmothers' generation. Think about what life was like for them as women — especially when it comes to life in the business world. Once you've captured that image, I'd like you to fast-forward to the present, to your own lives. A bit different, right? Yes, over the last 100 or so years we've made leaps and bounds in terms of the disparity between the sexes in the workplace.

Yes, the Gender Pay Gap Is Real, and No, It’s Not Women’s Fault

Women don't ask, so they don't get. Or: women should wait their turn, and let karma sort it out. Or: women choose low-paying jobs, and/or work fewer hours, so they shouldn't expect to be paid as much as a man. There's just one problem with all of these explanations for why the gender pay gap isn't real, or at least, isn't really an issue that needs solving: they're all nonsense.

#EqualPayDay: 10 Quotes to Inspire You to Fight for Pay Equity

Equal Pay Day is the date when women's pay symbolically "catches up" with men's earnings from the previous year. This year, April 12 is the big day: the average woman has now made as much money, from Jan 1, 2015 until today, as the average man did by New Year's Eve 2015.

There are a lot of reasons why women earn less than men. PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap, show that even in similar roles, controlling for education, experience, and hours worked, women make less money than men. Unconscious bias is a factor, as is "job choice"; women are more likely than men to work at low-paying jobs, and less likely than men to be in leadership roles.

When Being a Working Mom Is the Pits, Here’s What You Need to Remember

Working mothers do indeed have it all – if by "having it all," you mean having both sides of a double-edged sword. Women are still fighting for equal opportunity and equitable pay, so when you pile on the added pressure of balancing a career and family, there's enough guilt there to drive anyone mad … and sad. If you choose (or "choose") to return to work after having a baby, you're going to have to accept that your decision will have its ups and its downs. Here's what you need to know to get through those times when you start to doubt whether you're cut out to be a working mom.

3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You’re Voting for Someone Else)

Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.

Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads

Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.

The U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team and the Absurdity of the Gender Pay Gap

The gender pay gap is a complicated issue. Though it's partly caused by the fact that men are more likely to hold higher-paying jobs, it's also true that women are, on average, paid less for performing the same jobs as men. The solution to the gap is often summed up at its most basic as "equal pay for equal work," meaning assuming all else is equal, a woman performing the same job as a man and achieving the same results should receive the same pay. If that woman outperforms her male counterpart, her salary should increase commensurate with her performance, and vice versa. That's easy to understand. Seems fair. Makes sense. Gender should not factor into pay whatsoever.

The U.S. Women's National Soccer Team is putting that idea to the test: On Thursday five star players on the team filed a wage-discrimination action against the U.S. Soccer Federation with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Obama Plans to Fight the Gender Pay Gap With Data

Exactly seven years ago today, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, amending the Civil Rights Act to alter the statute of limitations for discrimination claims. It was the first bill he signed into law as president, and an important tool for women fighting to close the gender pay gap. Today, Obama extends those protections by announcing a new rule to require companies with 100 or more employees to furnish the government with pay data on gender, race, and ethnicity.

Negotiating While Female: How to Get the Salary You Deserve

First things first: despite what you might have heard, women are not worse negotiators than men. They're not even that much less likely to ask for a raise. Data collected for PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide showed that women reported negotiating salary nearly as often as men: 42 percent of women and 45 percent of men said they'd asked for a raise in their current field. However, research has shown that women are penalized more severely in terms of social costs when they engage in behaviors that appear "aggressive" or "unlikeable" – such as, for example, asking for more cash.

Companies Insist on Collaboration, So Women Do More

In workplaces around the country, it's not uncommon for employers to encourage or even insist on a collaborative environment. In fact, studies show that time spent on collaborative tasks in the office rose by roughly 50 percent over the last 20 years. However, there's just one little problem: women are the ones getting stuck with the bulk of the work.