• 3 Tricks for Improving Your Presentations
    Giving presentations at work can be nerve-wracking business. Even if you consider yourself something of an extrovert, there will likely be times when you don't feel confident or fully prepared to talk to a whole room full of people. Here are three simple steps you can take to deliver presentations that are clear, effective, and engaging for the audience.
  • Could These Be the 5 Most Bizarre Job Interview Questions?
    Job interview questions should have only one purpose, and that's to figure out whether or not the candidate is a good fit. Unfortunately, some hiring managers didn't get that particular memo, and take interview questions – particularly behavioral ones – to ridiculous extremes. Think less "Tell me about a time you faced a challenge at work" and more "If you were any object in a kitchen what would you be and why?" Sure, sometimes these questions are a creative way of digging out the interviewee's best and worst qualities, but other times, they're just plain strange. You'd be forgiven for wondering, on the applicant side of the table, if the hiring manager was just messing with you.
  • Learn to Love Goal-Setting (Yes, Really!)
    Some companies ask all of their employees to set goals at about the same time every year, while others might just bring up the idea of goal-setting during individual performance reviews. Other companies don't talk much about goals at all, but most employees still have them just the same. Thinking about where we want to go next is an important step in helping us grow professionally. But, the process can be kind of a drag. Here are a few tips to help you maximize the experience.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 200,000 Jobs in March
    Prior to this morning's release of the monthly ADP National Employment Report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting the addition of 194,000 jobs to private payrolls in March. The actual tally, 200,000 jobs, just exceeded their expectations.
  • How Much Would #ManInTree Get Paid?
    Last week, the Seattle area was pining for more information about #ManInTree. While many people thought he just wanted to be leafed alone, we at PayScale decided to take it one step further. We followed our typical root-ine and asked ourselves, what would a #ManInTree get paid in the job market?
  • People Are Living in Indoor Boxes Now in San Francisco, Because the Rent Is Too High
    OK, fine, it's just one person, but isn't that still too many? Freelance illustrator Peter Berkowitz currently lives in an 8-foot-long, 4.5-foot-high wooden box in his friends' living room. He tells The Washington Post that his decision to construct and move into the box wasn't "fueled by poverty," but rather the desire to achieve "some kind of middle ground between having a bedroom and sleeping on a couch."
  • How to Keep Your Lazy Co-Worker From Ruining Your Career
    If you listen to NPR's Morning Edition on your way to work, you probably heard their recent segment, Before You Judge Lazy Workers, Consider They Might Serve a Purpose, which used agricultural studies involving ants and surprising advice from productivity experts to make the case that lazy individuals aren't always bad for the group. If you are not a lazy individual, but a member of the team that has to deal with them, however, you might have started your day with a white-knuckled rage grip on the steering wheel, screaming at your windshield as other commuters tried to pretend they were absorbed by the flow of traffic. Laziness, good? Tell that to the folks who have to pick up the slack. Why should Ferris get to ditch when everybody else has to go?
  • How Your New Salary Negotiation Hero Scored a $30,000 Raise
    In the post-recession economy, most people would count themselves lucky to get a 3 percent annual raise, or make a jump to a new job that gives them a couple of extra thousand dollars a year – even if that bump seems to disappear, once taxes come out. But not Claudia Telles. The 28-year-old quality specialist tells Business Insider that she managed to jump from a $41,000 annual salary to $72,000 – all without leaving her employer.
  • Have a Messy Desk? You're in Great Company
    Do you have a messy office? Maybe your co-workers laugh about it a little when they pass by, but you assure them that you can "find anything in a matter of seconds" despite the way things look. Do you sometimes find yourself wondering how or why others manage to keep their spaces so tidy? If you have a messy desk, don't fret. It's not as bad a sign as you, or others, might think. Here are a few things you should know.
  • California Is About to Raise the Minimum Wage to $15 Per Hour
    Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday that California has reached a "landmark deal" to increase the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022, after lawmakers made a tentative agreement over the weekend. If approved by the state assembly, the deal will make California the first state in the nation to adopt a $15 minimum wage for all workers.
  • What Buffer's Gender Pay Gap Can Tell Us About Unconscious Bias
    Pay transparency is supposed to help companies close the gender pay gap. By being open about their compensation philosophy, sometimes to the point of posting employee salaries for everyone to see, decision-makers hope to catch pay inequities before they become entrenched. Buffer, the social media management tool provider, is one of the companies that's most publicly committed to transparency, publishing not only their salary formula, but a public spreadsheet of every salary at the company, from the CEO on down – which is why the company was taken aback to discover that female employees make less than males.
  • #MondayMotivation: Learn How to Procrastinate From 3 Famous Writers
    If you're a committed procrastinator, you're probably also pretty good at making excuses. Missed trains, minor domestic crises, even the tried-and-true "the dog ate my homework" routine – they're all pretty good for a delay, provided you don't use them too often. After a while, people will wonder why the train works for them, but not for you ... and how much it would cost to send your dog to obedience school on your behalf. Eventually, you're going to need some new stories to tell the boss.
  • 5 Ways to Spring-Clean Your Career
    Many cultures have a tradition of cleaning house in the spring. That just makes sense: spring is a time of visible new beginnings, in the form of budding flowers and longer days, and for a lot of us, it's the first time in months we've had the energy to contemplate doing more than the bare minimum. If you've been feeling stuck in your career, spring is also the perfect time to dust off your resume and start honing your skills. You could be in a totally different place, professionally, by the time winter rolls round again.
  • Presidential Campaigns and the Gender Pay Gap
    Recently, Jezebel analyzed presidential candidates' campaigns to see which have the most significant pay disparities between male and female staffers. You may be a bit surprised to learn who has the "fairest" campaign in terms of the gender pay gap.
  • Economist on Revised Jobless Claims: Numbers Suggest 'Not Much Slack Remains in the Labor Market'

    This week's jobless claims were lower than expected, but that's not the biggest economic news this week. That honor goes to the revised claims for the first week of March, reports Business Insider.

    "Most of the changes were relatively modest, but the most notable aspect of the revisions is that claims for the week of March 5th (3 weeks ago) were revised down to 253,000 which is, as far as we can tell, the lowest weekly claims figure since November 24, 1973," writes Thomas Simons, senior economist at Jefferies. Simons called this "a remarkable statistic and it continues to suggest that not that much slack remains in the labor market."

  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Be a Superhero Manager
    "I have to go to work tomorrow," a friend of mine recently informed me. "And the worst part is, I'm still not Batman." For most of us, work is a far cry from superheroics, unless you count being able to endure an interminable meeting without sighing a feat of strength. (And sometimes, it is.) But as the lead story in this week's roundup shows us, being good at managing is a superpower – but one you can develop over time, with no origin story required. Read all about that, plus the assumptions you should stop making about LinkedIn, and the ways in which your brand will change over time, in this week's post.
  • Teach Yourself to Be an Early Bird
    Society simply hasn't shaken its bad habit of early mornings. Despite the groggy dispositions, endless eye boogers, and general "lack of sleep," we cannot get away from getting up early. It's a fact-pill that we have to swallow—the worst of our essential vitamins. But maybe after all of these years, you've convinced yourself to conform. Maybe you're over the feeling of your alarm hitting you like a freight train. If that's you, then there's good news: we've got a guide to get you there.
  • The 5 Hardest Working Cities in America
    Americans work hard. Actually, we work more than anyone else in the industrialized world, we're terrible about taking our vacation time, and we retire later too. But, some parts of the country are a little extra into hard work. In order to determine the hardest working cities in America for 2016, WalletHub analyzed the 116 largest cities in the country along six metrics. Let's take a look at their top five.
  • 4 Possible Surprises From the Offices of the Future
    Of course, no one knows for sure what the future will bring, but that hasn't stopped humans from trying to predict what's to come for centuries. These days, it's especially difficult to speculate about the future because things are changing so quickly. Who knows what will come along next? Still, it's fun to think about. Also, there are also some current workplace trends than can help our guesses veer toward the more educated variety. When thinking about the offices of the future, here are a few wild to semi-wild possibilities to keep on your radar.
  • Amazon Reveals Pay Data After All, Shows Virtually No Gender Pay Gap
    Earlier this week, the Securities and Exchange Commission rejected Amazon's request to keep their pay data private, after Arjuna Capital filed a shareholder resolution to request that data. Yesterday, Amazon announced that it will share pay data – and that women at the company currently make 99.9 cents for every dollar male employees earn. Amazon also revealed that minority employees make 100.1 cents for every dollar earned by white employees.

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