• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Oversharing Hurting Your Career?
    It's a catch-22: in order to build a successful career in the 21st century, you need a personal brand. In order to build a personal brand, you need to participate in social media. But, the easiest way to tank said personal brand, and possibly your career as well, is to say something dumb online – which is, of course, easy to do, thanks to social media. This week's roundup looks at how to manage the urge to say just a little too much online; plus, how to get noticed for the good stuff, not the bad, and 29 questions to answer to discover the real you.
  • 6 Tips to Climb the Corporate Ladder
    Want to be the boss someday? In addition to gaining experience and building skill sets, you'll need to take on new responsibilities and rise to the level of your next job. While ambition is key, there is more to proving that you are ready for the next level, if you want to make it big in the corporate world.
  • Why Do Married Moms Make Less Than Married Dads?
    The largest gender pay gap, according to PayScale's latest report, is between married women with children and married men with children. This is true whether you look at uncontrolled data, or controlled data that accounts for job type, education, management responsibilities, and location, and so on. It's that controlled data that tells the real story. Generally, when we talk about why women earn less than men, we attribute the discrepancy, at least in part, to the idea that women are more likely to prioritize family over work. But, respondents to PayScale's survey, which forms the basis for the report, told us a very different story.
  • 5 Ways to Tell If the Corporate Culture Is Right for You ... Before Accepting a Job Offer
    Finding the right company is just as important as finding the right job. Far too many professionals take the first job offer thrown their way out of desperation and impulse, without considering whether the company is a good fit, culturally. That's like marrying someone after the first or second date without knowing anything about that person, other than what you gathered online. A little crazy, right? Unfortunately, what ends up happening is that these eager professionals quickly grow unhappy in their jobs after discovering that it wasn't love at first sight – and this, folks, is why there are so many unhappy and disgruntled workers in America.
  • Dear Kate Winslet, We Need to Talk (About Pay)
    Normally, I'm the first in line to join the Kate Winslet Fangirl Club. Between her undeniable acting talent, and her frank discussions about subjects like body image and the way Hollywood treats women as they age, she really seems like a cool, confident, smart lady. But in a recent interview with the BBC, she called the public conversation around the gender pay gap "vulgar."
  • 5 Signs Your Career Has Reached a Standstill
    You drag your feet on the way to work. You're doing the same old job you did an eternity ago. You just don't know where it's all headed. If you feel unappreciated or are not challenged enough, you may be stuck at a dead end, careerwise. Here are a few signs that your career has reached a standstill.
  • SCIENCE: Why Do We Go to Work When We're Sick?
    There is a real, dumb reason we go into work when we're sick, and it's super scientific. We broke down analysis by the researchers at the University of East Anglia to help us understand this madness.
  • Fact Check: Do Welders Really Make More Than Philosophers?
    If you watched Tuesday's GOP debate on Fox Business, you undoubtedly heard Neil Cavuto tell you that things were really, definitely interesting. And they were: each candidate had ample time to lay out broad details of their economic agenda, and an opportunity to show why theirs was superior to the others. Many times, however, the most interesting thing that was said wasn't a policy issue, but instead anecdotal claims left unchecked by the moderators. In particular, Marco Rubio had some interesting things to say about vocational training.
  • The 5 Best Cities for Veterans
    Veterans make up about 7.5 percent of the workforce in the U.S., and have an unemployment rate of 3.9 percent, according to last month's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics – more than a full percentage point lower than the 5 percent unemployment rate for the country as a whole. In fact, last month's data reflects a seven-year low for veterans' unemployment. But not all U.S. cities are created equal, when it comes to employment opportunities and quality of life for veterans.
  • How to Manage a Manager's Transition
    Just when you've built a healthy rapport with your manager, shared your career aspirations, and are confident that your progress will be taken care of, your manager quits, is reassigned, or is transferred. You now have to reinvest your time and energy in building another new relationship. Don't panic: there are a few things you can do to make sure your new reporting structure does not harm your career.
  • 5 Free Online Courses to Boost Your Career
    One of the most frustrating things a professional will face in their career is feeling stuck. There comes a point when the competition is steep in your field and the only way to get a leg up is to tack another skill or certification onto your resume. The only problem is: how do you find the time? Read on to learn more about free online courses that can boost your career in little to no time at all.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Olden Polynice, Former NBA Player, Current Advocate for Disability Awareness
    Before racking up 15 NBA seasons with some of the top teams of the '90s, including the Seattle SuperSonics, Detroit Pistons, and Utah Jazz, NBA veteran Olden Polynice — a six-foot-eleven, Haitian-born, Harlem-raised center with a friendly smile and an unforgettable name — was told by doctors that he would never walk, let alone share a basketball court with the likes of Hakeem Olajuwon, Karl Malone, and Michael Jordan.
  • For the First Time Ever, Computer Science Is the Most Popular Major for Women at Stanford
    There's no reason to beat around the bush or sugarcoat it: STEM has a woman problem and it has for a while now. However, here's a bit of good news: Stanford University recently announced that, for the first time in the university's history, computer science is the top major for female students this year. Yeah, you read that right.
  • When Your Workload Shrinks, Don't Panic
    You've been doing a two-person job. You're stretched too thin and you constantly find yourself answering an increasing number of queries, working on multiple projects, and giving advice on almost everything. Then, the company hires someone to take some of your workload. Now that there's a new person to take some stuff off your plate, you can finally breathe easy. Or can you?
  • #ThisPsychMajor Agrees With Jeb Bush — Sort Of
    At a recent town hall event, Jeb Bush said that psych majors "end up working at Chick-fil-A." He went on to add that, "I just don't think people are getting jobs as psych majors." As a fully employed former psychology major, I have to say I resent that. In fact, I've written before on how to turn your psych major into a lucrative career, demonstrating that it's entirely possible to find employment outside the retail sector. But that doesn't mean that getting a job with a bachelor's in psychology is easy.
  • Salesforce Commits to Closing Gender Pay Gap ... to the Tune of $3M
    Earlier this year, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff told The Huffington Post that he would examine the pay of all 16,000 employees at the cloud computing company, with the ultimate goal of eradicating the gender pay gap at the organization. He anticipated that the process would take a few years. Last week, while addressing the Fortune Global Forum, Benioff announced that his company had closed the gap, at least as far as role-to-role parity is concerned, in just six months. Estimated cost? $3 million dollars.
  • 5 Tips for Making Difficult Decisions at Work
    Tough choices cross our desks every day. Oftentimes (thankfully) we know what we want to do and we know how to go about getting it done. However, every so often a choice might leave you scratching your head and wondering what your next move should be. If you're feeling indecisive, but need to move forward somehow, here are some tips to help you get over the hump.
  • Stay-at-Home Moms Are on the Rise, But Not Always By Choice
    Families have a lot of tough decisions to make, when it comes to finances. One of the trickiest can be whether or not one parent ought to stay home while the kids are young. There are many pieces to this complicated puzzle, but a recent report shows that one single factor is pretty influential – the cost of child care versus the price of rent. Let's take a closer look.
  • When Your Boss Just Won't Listen
    It is very frustrating when you talk to your boss and he or she won't listen. Your repeated attempts at getting your thoughts across fall on deaf years and you don't feel respected or valued. If this is a problem you face at work, then you might need to change your approach to communicating.
  • When Setbacks Happen, Stay Strong Like an Animal
    The next time adversity strikes your work plan, don't crumble — take some inspiration from the animal world and make the best of things. Whether your spirit beast is a tiny ant or a clever bird, you can use these animals as guides on your journey to being a more awesome human.

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