• How to Quit Your Job Without Making Everyone Hate You
    The average worker has 12 jobs in the course of a career, which means that you can count on leaving a position about 12 times between the start of your working life and retirement. Ideally, most of those job changes will be voluntary, involving a jump to a better gig, with interesting new challenges and a bigger paycheck. But even if everything goes according to your best-laid plans, there's one hurdle you'll have to cross again and again in order to get to where you want to be in your career: you're going to have to quit your job.
  • Millennials Make Work Culture Better for Everyone
    It's not hard to make a case that employers are scrambling for ways to appeal to Millennials. In fact, as a Wall Street Journal article from last week shows, even corporate titans like Goldman Sachs are having a hard time pinning down the cloud that is the Millennial workforce. Anecdotally, this author's most shared work is consistently that which mentions Millennials in the headline. All this might indicate that you, the Millennial worker, have some unspoken power of influence in your office. Let's take a look at how that can play out when an employer really starts to listen.
  • 4 Great Benefits of Having a Side Job
    In a perfect world, we would only take on side jobs because we really wanted to. Unfortunately, wage stagnation means that many workers take on side jobs (or even second full-time positions) in order to make ends meet. Working too many hours is never recommended, but side jobs can have their benefits (assuming you still have some downtime in your schedule). Let's take a look at some of pluses.
  • College ROI Report: Highest Student Loan Payments Made By Those Who Can Least Afford Them
    College may be more expensive than ever before, but the cost of not going to college is pretty steep, as well. For the most part, college graduates earn more, have lower unemployment rates, and are less likely to live in poverty than their less-educated peers. But that doesn't mean that it's easy to pay student loans with a recent graduate's salary (or potential lack thereof, depending on the job market upon graduation). In fact, PayScale's College ROI Report shows that the highest college loans are likely to be held by the borrowers with the lowest income.
  • How to Ensure Your Flexible Schedule Is a Blessing and Not a Curse
    Whether you're a working parent, a college student, or just someone who wants to avoid wasting hours in a standard 9-to-5 commute, being granted a flexible work schedule seems like a dream come true. However, what happens when your flex schedule results in more work and stress than you expected? Here's how flex schedules can go wrong, and how to get them back on track.
  • Here's Why CEO Pay Matters
    The Great Recession hit the U.S. economy pretty darn hard, and American workers are still recovering. We've learned, in recent years, that an improving economy doesn't necessarily mean better pay for workers. However, despite these challenging economic trends, top executives continue to earn huge sums of money, especially compared with how much their employees make and when measured against how much people in their position used to earn in decades past. Let's take a look at a few facts about CEO pay and also examine why it really does matter, quite a lot actually, to you and your employer.
  • 3 Signs That Your Career Is on the Path to Success
    Gone are the days when entering the corporate world and working hard throughout your career meant a sure shot at success and living the American Dream. Now, career success is much less linear and there's a lot more navigating and rerouting that happens along the way. In fact, it almost seems as though there is no "path" at all, and we're now forced to chart our own journey to success for ourselves. How do you know, then, if you're headed in the right direction?
  • Yes, the Gender Pay Gap Is Real, and No, It's Not Women's Fault
    Women don't ask, so they don't get. Or: women should wait their turn, and let karma sort it out. Or: women choose low-paying jobs, and/or work fewer hours, so they shouldn't expect to be paid as much as a man. There's just one problem with all of these explanations for why the gender pay gap isn't real, or at least, isn't really an issue that needs solving: they're all nonsense.
  • These Terrible #EqualPayDay Tweets Will Make You Cringe
    Even though research and data from multiple organizations have found that there is in fact a significant gender pay gap in America, not everyone believes in numbers. And with the power of the internet and the hashtag #EqualPayDay, we get to see how some people really feel about the gender pay gap and equal pay for women. Hold on to your unicorns, people, because the debate starts ... now.
  • The Gender Pay Gap Is Worse for Women of Color
    When we talk about pay inequity, especially on Equal Pay Day, we generally talk about the differences between men's earnings and women's earnings – meaning all men and all women, without regard to race. To really unpack the problem, however, we need to dig further into the data and look at how race and ethnicity impacts earnings. Bottom line: the gender pay gap is particularly bad for women of color.
  • Video: Equal Pay Day and Candy Bars

    On average, U.S. women make $.74 on the dollar compared to men.

    Some studies say more, and some less. But the fact that women earn less than men in general is not a myth; it's an inarguable fact.

    That said, it's a fact that's used out of context or misunderstood. A lot.

    While it's true that, typically, women make less than men for doing the same jobs, that discrepancy is not nearly as large as the $.74 to the dollar figure. This oft-cited figure comes from the fact that men and women tend to hold different jobs.

  • 6 Ways Women (and Men) Can Celebrate Equal Pay Day 2016
    Equal Pay Day has been on our calendars since its conception by the National Committee on Pay Equity in 1996, but very little has actually been done to close the wage gap between men and women in America. Recent research shows that in 2016, women only earn 74 cents for every dollar a man makes. Even if we look at men and women in the same jobs, women earn less: comparing only like job titles, experience, and education, women make 97 percent of what men earn. If this information rustles your jimmies like it does mine, I've got six things you can do right now to help close the gender pay gap this Equal Pay Day.
  • #EqualPayDay: 10 Quotes to Inspire You to Fight for Pay Equity

    Equal Pay Day is the date when women's pay symbolically "catches up" with men's earnings from the previous year. This year, April 12 is the big day: the average woman has now made as much money, from Jan 1, 2015 until today, as the average man did by New Year's Eve 2015.

    There are a lot of reasons why women earn less than men. PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap, show that even in similar roles, controlling for education, experience, and hours worked, women make less money than men. Unconscious bias is a factor, as is "job choice"; women are more likely than men to work at low-paying jobs, and less likely than men to be in leadership roles.

  • 5 Employers Who Will Help Pay Your Student Loans
    The student loan debt crisis is having a real impact on individuals and the economy in general. As a result, some lawmakers want to encourage employers to help their workers pay down their student loan debt. One proposal, for example, would grant businesses and workers a tax break.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 People Who Found Success After 40
    It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that career success strikes either early or not at all. The media loves stories about wunderkinds who make their mark (and their fortune) when they're barely old enough to rent a car. But your career doesn't stop when you turn 30, or 40, or 50. If you've been putting off following your dreams because you think it's too late to change careers, take inspiration from these famous folks – none of whom were a household name until middle age.
  • The 4 Best Ways to Help a Graduating Student With the Job Hunt

    We've all heard the phrase, "There's light at the end of the tunnel" in one variant or another. The older that we get, the more we're able to reflect back on all the pinpoints of light we've gazed upon as various phases of our lives came to a culmination. Whether it was that feeling of satisfaction you had after completing the chores your parents assigned or acing a test after studying for weeks, arriving at that moment when you come out of figurative darkness is a wonderful thing.

    For the typical college student, that light is always centered on the day they turn their credit hours into a formal degree. As graduation day draws near, so too do countless other thoughts that race through every soon-to-be graduate's mind — from finals and term papers to friendships and freedom. With all of these distractions, it's no wonder that it's difficult for many students to fathom the real-life challenges that are ahead.

  • Why Young Women Quit: Busting the Myths
    Leaders often assume that the main reason women in their 20s and 30s quit their jobs is because they are having children and opting to "lean out." In fact, a recent global study shows, women leave for the same reason men do: they want more money. The truth is that young women simply aren't being paid as much or promoted to top jobs at the same rate as their male colleagues. So why do so many employers assume that women quit because of family, instead of finances?
  • These 5 Jobs Only Require a Two-Year Degree and Are Perfect for a Mid-Career Change
    If you were the same person you were when you first started out in your career, things wouldn't be so complicated. However, over time, you've matured as an individual and a professional, so it's only natural that your priorities shifted accordingly. As a result, you may have found that the career from which you thought you'd retire is now stifling and has become the bane of your existence. You're probably thinking that switching occupations mid-career isn't the wisest decision, but is staying in an unfulfilling, stagnant career until retirement the better option?
  • Recommending Your Friend for a Job? Read This First
    Working with your friend seems like a great idea. It's an even better idea if your friend has all the qualifications needed for the job at hand. But before you refer your bestie for the new opening on your team, carefully consider these tips and potentially negative consequences. Don't submit that resume to your hiring manager until you're sure that doing so is in everyone's best interests.
  • College ROI Report: These 5 Schools Offer the Highest Return on Investment

    Money might not buy happiness, but lack of money can sure set you up for a world of misery. Just ask any of the 6.9 million Americans – as of July, 2015 – who hadn't made a payment on their federal students in 360 days. In fact, about 17 percent of all borrowers were severely delinquent in paying their student loans last year. Why? Well, for one thing, it's hard to stay on top of your loans if you can't get a job with a salary high enough to pay them.

    For this reason, PayScale's College ROI Report is a valuable tool for entering students. While of course college choice needs to be based on a variety of factors like career goals, interests, and aptitude, thinking about life after graduation, professionally and financially, is also key. College isn't just vocational training, but if you're going to get into debt, you need to set yourself up to get a job that will allow you to pay off those loans.

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