ADVERTISEMENT
  • What You Need to Know About Furloughs
    In an ideal world, there would be no issues regarding compensation for work. You would go to work when you are supposed to, and in exchange, your employer would pay you your agreed-upon wage when he or she was supposed to do so. Unfortunately, due to problems of budgetary mismanagement on employers' parts, some workers have found that getting paid is not quite that simple. That is why it is important for all employees to understand their rights when it comes to issues like furloughs and reductions in pay. It is important to note that if you are a member of a labor union, you may have additional contractual rights in addition to the rights discussed here.
  • 3 Reasons Office Gossip Might Not Be All Bad
    When we think of office gossip, a lot of bad associations come to mind. The popular idea is that this kind of chatter is counter-productive, harmful, hurtful, and just plain bad. But, there is another side to office chit-chat. It turns out that gossip might not actually be entirely, innately, negative. Here are a few reasons why office gossip might be not only impossible to eliminate but also potentially beneficial.
  • 10 Standout Tips From #MondayMotivation
    Supposedly, Monday is one of the most productive days of the week, but some weeks, you couldn't prove it by how many of us feel. After a weekend of chores and catchup and sometimes, sneaky bits of work when our loved ones aren't looking, it's no wonder we don't feel super motivated come the first day of the week. Ironically, help arrives via one of the greatest means to waste time and tank your productivity: Twitter.
  • How to Answer the Question, 'What's Your Greatest Weakness?'
    After you've experienced even just a few job interviews, you have a basic idea of what to expect when you sit down across from a potential employer. You'll have a few minutes of small talk, then they'll ask you some questions about your experience and how it applies to the job you're interviewing for. And, at some point in the process, they'll hit you with some version of the familiar question: "What's your greatest weakness?"
  • 1 in 3 Workers Have Fallen Asleep on the Job
    How are you feeling today? If you said, "sleepy," you're not alone. In fact, one survey found that 31 percent of human resource leaders have seen or heard about a worker falling asleep on the job. The cost to companies is obvious – $63.2 billion in lost productivity due solely to insomnia – but if you're among those sleep-deprived workers, you're probably more concerned about the fact that all that lost sleep is impacting you personally and professionally.
  • Jobs to Thrill Your Inner Child: Life as a Human Hedge
    Imagine a world in which your exposure to nature was not relegated to an occasional hike in your off-hours, but rather designated as the source of your bread and butter. Enter a career in roving shrubbery, an unbelievable but actual career for a number of (presumably fascinating) people around the world. Check out the latest installment in PayScale's multi-job miniseries, Jobs to Thrill Your Inner Child, and learn about the people who pay their rent by pretending to be trees.
  • Managing Millennials? Focus on Improving 3 Key Work Skills
    Earlier this month, SkillSurvey published the results of some extensive research into the merits of millennial job candidates. The survey observed 28,700 references for around 7,000 job candidates, the vast majority of whom were born after 1980. The conclusion? Millennials are "eager, dedicated people who score high on ethics and integrity." But they're not without their problems.
  • Interactive Map Shows the Location of Most Jobs in the US
    Robert Manduca, a PhD student studying sociology and social policy at Harvard, has created an interactive map that plots 96 percent of the jobs in America according to category and location.
  • The Cardinals' New Hire Can Teach Managers All Something About Good Candidates
    "Fifteen years of experience playing football, first woman to play with men, and doctorate in psychology — I hope I can figure out something to contribute in there." That's what Dr. Jen Welter had to say when a reporter asked the new Arizona Cardinals assistant coaching intern, "What can you offer?" It's the kind of question managers should be asking every candidate up for a new job — but her answer, power-packed as it is, really only scratches the surface.
  • 10 Things to Do When You Get the Silent Treatment After a Job Interview
    Job interviews can be a lot like blind dates. You walk out of an awesome date thinking that this person is THE one. You've never felt more confident about anything in your life. Then, a couple of days turns into a week without you hearing back from that person, and you find yourself in a dumbfounded, anxiety-ridden tailspin, because you swore it was meant to be. The only thing you can do now is regain composure and figure out how to make sense of all this. Here are a few things to consider so that you can move on from this situation with more confidence and clarity, regardless of the outcome.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Kill the Vocal Fry, Get the Job You Deserve?
    There's plenty of debate about whether or not vocal fry, that Kardashian-esque speaking affectation, is bad for you, professionally. Some experts claim that talking like a reality TV star will permanently cripple your career, while others note that even high-level financial executives now embrace the professional equivalent of baby talk. Regardless, having more awareness of and control over your public image is always a good thing. This week's roundup covers how to manage vocal fry, plus networking without feeling phony, and staying productive during the lazy days of summer.
  • Can You Guess How Many Female CEOs There Are in the World?
    If you can't name the right number, don't worry: neither can executives. The 1,700 participants of a Weber Shandwick study guessed that 23 percent of CEOs at large companies were women. Take a look at the embarrassing results of the study and the shocking truth of how few female CEOs actually exist today.
  • Key & Peele Asks, 'What If We Worshipped Teachers Like We Do Pro Athletes?'
    Imagine a world in which teachers are hired via a draft broadcast live from Radio City Music Hall, do commercials for major brands, and scoop up contracts worth tens of millions of dollars. Or, you know, just watch Key & Peele's latest sketch, TeachingCenter, which does it for you.
  • 8 Things I Wish My High School Counselor Told Me About Applying to College
    Being a high school senior is tough. With the competitive nature of college admissions these days, balancing academics, extracurricular activities, family commitments, and applications is truly a feat. While high school counselors are at their disposal during the crucial months of October through December, seniors are tirelessly scouring college confidential forums, messaging alumni, and hacking into college admissions databases simply because they aren't getting the information they want and need. So here's the million-dollar question: What questions do 12th graders have that aren't being answered by the school counseling department?
  • How to Stay Healthy During a Conference
    Whether you're still recovering from Comic-Con a few weeks ago, or you're gearing up to take a few of your colleagues out to NYC for LeadsCon at the end of August, you're probably well aware of how exhausting conventions and conferences can be. Swarms of people, reams of business cards, and a whole lot of handshakes — sounds like you need a battle plan.
  • What's Your Employer's Philosophy: Work to Live or Live to Work?
    In 2006, Treehouse CEO Ryan Carson decided to give employees of the Portland, Oregon-based technology education company three-day weekends every week, arguing that living to work instead of working to live is not the best (or at least only) key to a company's profitability and overall success. But, that doesn't mean that his decision was motivated solely by a desire to be a more humane boss. Employers making similar decisions are just as interested in the bottom line as they are in making workers' lives better. It turns out, working less sometimes means producing more – and better – work.
  • 5 Ways to Boost Productivity on Your 15-Minute Break
    Is your brain saying "Friday," while the calendar insists it's Wednesday? The monotony of the day-in and day-out of your job can cause your productivity to come to a screeching halt long before the workweek is over. These 15-minute productivity boosters will help you get back on track, so that you can clock-out with confidence.
  • Stop Wishing Your Job Was More Creative and Make It So
    Did you ever wish you had a job that allowed you to exercise more creativity? You're not alone. Today's workers crave opportunities to exercise creativity, and they want to work for a company that allows them to take creative risks. But, it's not all up to your employer. Here are some tips for being more creative at work, no matter what you do for a living.
  • Need to Vent? BetterCompany Lets You Talk Anonymously About Work
    One of the trickiest and most annoying things you'll have to deal with in your career is office drama. One app aims to combat office politics by creating a "safe place" for co-workers to discuss work matters openly and honestly with one another, all while remaining anonymous. Read on to learn more (and where you can sign up).
  • These Are the 5 Least Meaningful Jobs (According to the People Who Do Them)
    Even if your job is just for the paycheck, and you get most of your joy and satisfaction after work hours are over, you probably don't want to work at a totally meaningless gig. After all, if you're going to spend at least a third of your life – and most of your waking hours during your workweek – at your job, it'd be nice if you got something out of it besides the means to pay the rent. If meaningful work is important to you, you'll want to take a look at PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs – special emphasis on these jobs, which workers say are least likely to make the world a better place.