• Economist on Revised Jobless Claims: Numbers Suggest 'Not Much Slack Remains in the Labor Market'

    This week's jobless claims were lower than expected, but that's not the biggest economic news this week. That honor goes to the revised claims for the first week of March, reports Business Insider.

    "Most of the changes were relatively modest, but the most notable aspect of the revisions is that claims for the week of March 5th (3 weeks ago) were revised down to 253,000 which is, as far as we can tell, the lowest weekly claims figure since November 24, 1973," writes Thomas Simons, senior economist at Jefferies. Simons called this "a remarkable statistic and it continues to suggest that not that much slack remains in the labor market."

  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Be a Superhero Manager
    "I have to go to work tomorrow," a friend of mine recently informed me. "And the worst part is, I'm still not Batman." For most of us, work is a far cry from superheroics, unless you count being able to endure an interminable meeting without sighing a feat of strength. (And sometimes, it is.) But as the lead story in this week's roundup shows us, being good at managing is a superpower – but one you can develop over time, with no origin story required. Read all about that, plus the assumptions you should stop making about LinkedIn, and the ways in which your brand will change over time, in this week's post.
  • Teach Yourself to Be an Early Bird
    Society simply hasn't shaken its bad habit of early mornings. Despite the groggy dispositions, endless eye boogers, and general "lack of sleep," we cannot get away from getting up early. It's a fact-pill that we have to swallow—the worst of our essential vitamins. But maybe after all of these years, you've convinced yourself to conform. Maybe you're over the feeling of your alarm hitting you like a freight train. If that's you, then there's good news: we've got a guide to get you there.
  • The 5 Hardest Working Cities in America
    Americans work hard. Actually, we work more than anyone else in the industrialized world, we're terrible about taking our vacation time, and we retire later too. But, some parts of the country are a little extra into hard work. In order to determine the hardest working cities in America for 2016, WalletHub analyzed the 116 largest cities in the country along six metrics. Let's take a look at their top five.
  • 4 Possible Surprises From the Offices of the Future
    Of course, no one knows for sure what the future will bring, but that hasn't stopped humans from trying to predict what's to come for centuries. These days, it's especially difficult to speculate about the future because things are changing so quickly. Who knows what will come along next? Still, it's fun to think about. Also, there are also some current workplace trends than can help our guesses veer toward the more educated variety. When thinking about the offices of the future, here are a few wild to semi-wild possibilities to keep on your radar.
  • Amazon Reveals Pay Data After All, Shows Virtually No Gender Pay Gap
    Earlier this week, the Securities and Exchange Commission rejected Amazon's request to keep their pay data private, after Arjuna Capital filed a shareholder resolution to request that data. Yesterday, Amazon announced that it will share pay data – and that women at the company currently make 99.9 cents for every dollar male employees earn. Amazon also revealed that minority employees make 100.1 cents for every dollar earned by white employees.
  • There's a New Type of Pay Gap: The Height and Weight Gap
    As if gender wasn't a shallow-enough reason for the persistent wage gap, a new study found that height and weight have been added to the mix, too. More specifically, if you're a short male or an overweight female, then you can bet that you earn less than your taller, thinner colleagues. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Actually Useful Job Perks You Didn't Know You Wanted
    These days, it's all about the perks: companies, possibly in lieu of an abundance of jobs or exorbitant salaries, have made an effort to outdo each other in the perk department. Netflix upped the ante in 2015 by announcing a year of paid family leave, and Facebook went as far as to offer egg freezing. And while those are certainly offers that will make you pause, the majority of us not working at the world's most sought-after tech jobs may wonder what's left on the table for the regular folk. Enter: these interesting offers.
  • Are Millennials Changing the Culture of Work?

    What the boss says, goes. Don't put anything online that you wouldn't print out and hang over your desk. Don't expect a free lunch, or a fast promotion, and always remember: your mama doesn't work here.

    Those are the old rules of corporate culture, and most of us – especially if we were born before ubiquitous internet – agree that they're still the smart way to go. After all, what is etiquette, but a way to keep from driving our neighbors crazy, whether those neighbors live across a driveway or on the other side of a cubicle wall?

  • What You're Twice as Likely to Do When You Telecommute
    Telecommuting is on the rise. As the number of folks who work from home increases, new data begin to emerge about their experience. If you're considering telecommuting at some point in the future, the results of a recent survey should be of interest to you.
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Answering the Worst Job Interview Question, 'What's Your Salary History?'
    First things first: anyone who tells you that you can always dodge the salary history question is probably trying to sell you something. The reality of the situation is that sometimes, you just can't wriggle out of answering this question – not if you want to stay a viable candidate for the job. But, that doesn't mean that you should name your price right away. You might be able to get the hiring manager to focus on the future, not the past, and that's what you're hoping for.
  • 5 Emotional Skills Every Worker Should Possess
    If you're looking for work right now, you've probably heard a lot about the importance of developing skills (with technology, for example) as an essential step toward getting hired. But, you may have noticed an awful lot of talk about soft skills, as well. Writing, public speaking, and teamwork are increasingly coveted by employers. High emotional intelligence helps you develop the soft skills on your next employer's wishlist.
  • This Internship Will Pay You $12k to Drink Lots Of Beer
    If you've been looking for a summer internship that actually pays you for your time and labor, your golden opportunity has arrived. And it involves booze. Lots and lots of it. Are you up for the challenge?
  • Everything You Know About Being Successful Is Wrong

    "Research shows that the kind of happiness that does lead to long-lasting fulfillment is the kind of happiness that's derived from positive social relationships with other people," says Dr. Emma Seppälä, the Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. "A life of meaning, a life of purpose, a life characterized by altruism, something greater than oneself."

    A life, in other words, that can feel pretty difficult to create in today's corporate culture, which prizes achievement and productivity. But maybe there's another way to live and work. Seppälä's new book, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, examines research on happiness, and makes the case that finding fulfillment builds success, not the other way around.

  • 4 Tips for Getting Along Better With Your Boss
    If you don't like your boss, you probably don't love going to work every day. In fact, bad managers are the number one reason people quit their jobs. No matter how you feel about your boss now, getting along better could make a big difference to your happiness at work. It makes sense to try to fix this dynamic. Here are a few things to keep in mind to help you build a good relationship with him or her.
  • Avoid These 5 LinkedIn Mistakes
    LinkedIn is a powerful networking tool, but like all tools, it's only as good as the person who wields it. Used well, LinkedIn can help you find a new job, hire fresh talent, or just strengthen your professional connections. But, in order to fully maximize the experience, you need a strong profile and a clear goal. You also need to avoid a few common LinkedIn mistakes that most users don't even realize they're making.
  • When an Occupation Becomes Female-Dominated, Pay Declines
    During any debate about the gender pay gap, one argument will eventually emerge: women make less than men because they choose lower-paying jobs. But what if it turns out that women aren't so much choosing low-paying jobs as working at jobs that are low-paid precisely because there are more women in those occupations? If that sounds far-fetched, one study, recently discussed at The Upshot in The New York Times, might change your mind. Researchers analyzed 50 years of U.S. Census data and found that pay drops when professions move from predominantly male to female – in short, if women do a job, it's likely to be low-paid, for no other reason than that women's work is undervalued.
  • Guess Which Company Doesn't Want to Reveal Its Gender Pay Data?
    There is a big movement for tech companies to publicly share data about the gender and racial diversity of their employees. However, while some companies are using this moment of crisis to show commitment to developing a more diverse, more productive workforce, others are less than eager to disclose numbers. In fact, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) just rejected a request from tech giant Amazon for exemption from a request from one of their investors to disclose gender pay data.
  • 3 Reasons Your Boss Should Want You to Work from Home
    Telecommuting can offer workers more flexibility, a greater feeling of independence, and the ability to work from anywhere in the world. It's not just great for you, the employee, either; it can offer real advantages for your employer, as well. If you're trying to convince your boss to let you work from home now and then, you'll want to focus on the ways that letting you telecommute benefits your team and the company as a whole.
  • 3 Redditors' Inspiring Stories of Drastic Career Changes
    It's no secret that many people are unhappy with their current jobs. But did you know that two-thirds of all working adults, and 73 percent of those in their 30s want to change careers? It's a fact of life that many of us have to take jobs that may not be our "dream" jobs, and maybe that concept is a sham anyway. However, that doesn't mean that you have to be unhappy in your current job forever — or that you can't transition to another career where you can still earn a living doing honest, practical work.

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