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  • Disney Workers Laid Off and Asked to Train Foreign Replacements
    Imagine receiving notice that you'd just lost your job. It'd be devastating. But, then, just think about being asked to train your replacement over a series of months – as you discovered that the jobs had been transferred to labor imported from other countries on a temporary visa for highly skilled technical workers. Would that kind of a situation feel like some kind of new level of hell? That's just what happened to workers at Disney, who found themselves facing unemployment ... and training the workers who would soon take over their jobs.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Get Along With the Boss
    Chances are, by the time you start your first "real" job, you've had bosses before. But what was appropriate at the ice cream stand or landscaping gig might not be OK in your new office environment. Even if you've had tons of internships and lots of practice dealing with corporate culture, expect a learning curve when you begin your first professional job. Every company and manager is different. If you want to be a success, you'll need to learn how to adapt and communicate with your particular boss.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Talk to Your College Grad About Getting a Job
    What's the difference between guiding and nagging? If you're a parent, the answer probably is, "Depends on the day." There are few times more challenging to parents of grownup kids than the period after graduation, when their newly minted grads head into an unknown future (and possibly back to their childhood bedroom). The challenge, of course, from a parent's perspective, is how to encourage them in their budding career, without driving them nuts. This week, we look at Kelsey Manning's advice for parents of recent grads. Plus: tips for brand-new Twitter users, and how to answer the dreaded question, "Don't you think you're overqualified?"
  • BLS Jobs Report: 280,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.5 Percent
    This morning's Employment Situation Summary from the labor department exceeded economists' predictions and showed an increase in average hourly earnings as well. The economy added 280,000 jobs last month, more than the 225,000 predicted by economists, and the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 5.5 percent (compared with 5.4 percent for the previous month). In addition, March and April's reports were revised upward by a combined 32,000 jobs.
  • Why 'Do What You Love' Is Bad Advice
    With just about every presidential candidate's campaign in full swing, one group we keep hearing about (and will continue to) is all of the ordinary, everyday Americans: The ones who are taking the brunt of the economic downturn, the ones who need someone to stand up for them, and the ones who need decent paying jobs to provide for their Norman Rockwell, picture-perfect American families. So what's the most popular suggestion for what these everyday Americans should do for work? DWYL – "do what you love."
  • Maybe Don't Wait for the Weekend to Apply for Jobs
    One of the challenges of looking for a job when you have a job is finding time to apply, without taking the risks of applying on the company time. For that reason, some job seekers dedicate their weekends to job searching, sending off their cover letters, CVs, and cold inquiries on Saturday and Sunday. There's just one problem: a recent study shows that by waiting until no one's in the office, you might be consigning your resume to a black hole.
  • Jon Stewart Comes Clean About His Top-Secret Bootcamp for Vets
    Jon Stewart has long showed his support for soldiers and veterans, even as he's been a vocal critic of the Iraq War. So, it's not a surprise that he's now being credited for a training program to help veterans break into the entertainment industry.
  • How to Make Smart Choices When Choosing Your Job References
    Having strong references can mean the difference between hearing, "You're hired!" and hearing nothing but dreaded silence. I've often covered the most appropriate methods of acquiring references, including asking permission, providing them with information about the position, and keeping them up-to-date with the overall process. This methodology is great if you already know who your references are, but where do you begin when you're not even sure who to ask?
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Use Data to Get Your Dream Job
    A long time ago, when I was a newly minted job seeker, a school friend and I sat down to talk about our job prospects – and how much we thought we should be paid. "I'm figuring on $60,000 a year to start," she said. When I asked how she came to that number, she replied, "Well, that's about how much I think I need to pay off my loans and live in the manner to which I'd like to become accustomed." Needless to say, her first administrative assistant job, way back in the year (intentional mumbling to obscure my age), did not come through the way she'd hoped, in terms of pay.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 201,000 Jobs in May
    After five months of declining jobs numbers, this morning's ADP National Employment Report showed gains of 201,000 jobs – almost exactly as economists predicted ahead of the release. The previous month's report was revised downward slightly, to 165,000 jobs.
  • Seriously, Do Not Lie About Your Salary as a Negotiation Tactic
    While the best salary negotiation advice is to try not to divulge your salary history, or to push the hiring manager to state a range, many won't play along. That's because they know that the person who names a number first is at a disadvantage – and they'd prefer to be "Not It." This is supremely frustrating to a job seeker. You could be forgiven for thinking that the best thing to do would be to stretch the numbers a bit, when asked to name your most recent salary.
  • All Stay-at-Home Parents Should Get a 'Wife Bonus'
    Someday, Dorothy will pull back the curtain on the internet and we'll discover not a man pulling levers, but the greatest communication tool of the 21st century, entirely powered by human outrage. Look no further than the recent flap over social researcher Wednesday Martin's forthcoming book Primates of Park Avenue, which examines the phenomenon of the "glam SAHM" – real Real Housewives who probably don't change a lot of diapers, but spend their time managing the careers of the future one percent. The inspiration for the furor? Like their financier husbands, these ladies apparently get a cash bonus for their efforts.
  • 5 Tips for Managing, Reducing, and Repurposing Stress
    High levels of stress can be very dangerous, exacerbating existing health problems and even creating new ones. Most Americans report unhealthy stress levels, and 1 in 5 people qualify their stress levels as "extremely high." Even though more than 60 percent of people report that they've tried to reduce their stress in the last five years, more than half, 53 percent, are still trying to meet that goal. In fact, being stressed has become just as American as apple pie – but just because it's common doesn't mean that it's okay.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Meaning at Work
    A 2014 survey by The Energy Project found that workers who find meaning in their work have 1.7 times higher job satisfaction, are 1.4 times more engaged in their jobs, and are three times more likely to stay at their employer. In short, if you want to enjoy what you do – and keep doing it – the most important factor may well be whether or not you find meaning in it. But what if, like many recent grads and newly minted professionals, you don't find much purpose in your 9 to 5? Then, it's time to get creative.
  • How to End a Toxic Work Friendship
    It's great to have friends at work, and there are a lot of benefits associated with it as well. But, when those friendships turn sour, they can take a toll on you personally as well as professionally. It can be difficult to detach and get distance from a toxic pal when you work together every day. But, it's an important thing to do no matter how tough it might be. Here are some tips for ending toxic workplace friendships.
  • 5 Things Working Mothers Really Want in Their Careers
    Women comprise nearly half of today's workforce. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.7 percent of households are dual-income, with both the husband and wife working. What's more, approximately 70 percent of these women are also mothers, who handle a vast majority of the household responsibilities along with their careers. It's not surprising, then, that working mothers are struggling to keep up with the high demands of juggling their personal and professional lives simultaneously. Here's what working mothers need in order to get a fair shot at attaining their goals in and out of the workplace.
  • 6 Things to Do When You Make a Mistake at Work
    We all make mistakes. It's part of life. But, that doesn't make it any easier to recover (in the eyes of others and within yourself) when you misstep at work. We're not talking about navigating a difference of opinion here, but rather an actual error that's plain as day for all to see and know. It can be hard to move through a time or situation where you've fumbled, but it's really important to recover and handle your mistakes in a positive way. Here are some tips.
  • 4 Reasons You Don't Need a Formal Mentor
    When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.
  • Early Career Success Guide: What If You Don't Know What to Do With Your Life?
    Only 53 percent of college graduates get a first job related to their major. Obviously, this is even less likely to be the case, if you studied for love and not for money or a clear career path. But does that mean that you're doomed to wander the job market, searching fruitlessly for a good-paying job that you'll actually enjoy?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: My Co-Worker Plans to Quit After Maternity Leave. Should I Tell?
    When we were kids, the rules of the playground were simple: don't snitch, unless you or someone else was in serious danger. As adults, it's slightly more complicated. For example, what if – like an Ask a Manager reader – you know that your colleague is planning to take paid maternity leave, and then quit? Alison Green's answer to that question, plus Dan Erwin's latest reading list, and Emmelie De La Cruz's tutorial on personal branding, in this week's roundup.