• 5 Employers Who Will Help Pay Your Student Loans
    The student loan debt crisis is having a real impact on individuals and the economy in general. As a result, some lawmakers want to encourage employers to help their workers pay down their student loan debt. One proposal, for example, would grant businesses and workers a tax break.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 People Who Found Success After 40
    It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that career success strikes either early or not at all. The media loves stories about wunderkinds who make their mark (and their fortune) when they're barely old enough to rent a car. But your career doesn't stop when you turn 30, or 40, or 50. If you've been putting off following your dreams because you think it's too late to change careers, take inspiration from these famous folks – none of whom were a household name until middle age.
  • The 4 Best Ways to Help a Graduating Student With the Job Hunt

    We've all heard the phrase, "There's light at the end of the tunnel" in one variant or another. The older that we get, the more we're able to reflect back on all the pinpoints of light we've gazed upon as various phases of our lives came to a culmination. Whether it was that feeling of satisfaction you had after completing the chores your parents assigned or acing a test after studying for weeks, arriving at that moment when you come out of figurative darkness is a wonderful thing.

    For the typical college student, that light is always centered on the day they turn their credit hours into a formal degree. As graduation day draws near, so too do countless other thoughts that race through every soon-to-be graduate's mind — from finals and term papers to friendships and freedom. With all of these distractions, it's no wonder that it's difficult for many students to fathom the real-life challenges that are ahead.

  • Why Young Women Quit: Busting the Myths
    Leaders often assume that the main reason women in their 20s and 30s quit their jobs is because they are having children and opting to "lean out." In fact, a recent global study shows, women leave for the same reason men do: they want more money. The truth is that young women simply aren't being paid as much or promoted to top jobs at the same rate as their male colleagues. So why do so many employers assume that women quit because of family, instead of finances?
  • These 5 Jobs Only Require a Two-Year Degree and Are Perfect for a Mid-Career Change
    If you were the same person you were when you first started out in your career, things wouldn't be so complicated. However, over time, you've matured as an individual and a professional, so it's only natural that your priorities shifted accordingly. As a result, you may have found that the career from which you thought you'd retire is now stifling and has become the bane of your existence. You're probably thinking that switching occupations mid-career isn't the wisest decision, but is staying in an unfulfilling, stagnant career until retirement the better option?
  • Recommending Your Friend for a Job? Read This First
    Working with your friend seems like a great idea. It's an even better idea if your friend has all the qualifications needed for the job at hand. But before you refer your bestie for the new opening on your team, carefully consider these tips and potentially negative consequences. Don't submit that resume to your hiring manager until you're sure that doing so is in everyone's best interests.
  • College ROI Report: These 5 Schools Offer the Highest Return on Investment

    Money might not buy happiness, but lack of money can sure set you up for a world of misery. Just ask any of the 6.9 million Americans – as of July, 2015 – who hadn't made a payment on their federal students in 360 days. In fact, about 17 percent of all borrowers were severely delinquent in paying their student loans last year. Why? Well, for one thing, it's hard to stay on top of your loans if you can't get a job with a salary high enough to pay them.

    For this reason, PayScale's College ROI Report is a valuable tool for entering students. While of course college choice needs to be based on a variety of factors like career goals, interests, and aptitude, thinking about life after graduation, professionally and financially, is also key. College isn't just vocational training, but if you're going to get into debt, you need to set yourself up to get a job that will allow you to pay off those loans.

  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Master the Sneaky Job Hunt
    The best time to look for a job might well be when you have a job, but that doesn't mean it's easy to engage in a lengthy interview process while you're still employed. This week's roundup looks at ways to do that without tipping off the boss – or at least, without alienating him or her. Also in the roundup: the never-fail job search tips you're probably ignoring, and ways to include testimonials on your resume, so there's no way hiring managers can miss how impressive you are.
  • Will You Help Me? Why Some Co-Workers Are More Likely to Say Yes Than Others
    Our interactions around the office, and our relationships with our colleagues, are certainly impacted by the corporate ladder and the rung on which we stand at any given point. Some employees might find themselves behaving a little differently with folks who are a few steps higher in the hierarchy when compared with how they act when they're around those who are a few notches below them. People even email differently when communicating with the top. To some extent, all of this is only natural. Of course interactions with higher-ups are a little different than with others. But, could status impact how willing people are to help each other around the office?
  • When the Cost of Living Skyrockets, Teachers Can't Live Where They Work
    You might think that teachers have a pretty good deal, getting the summer off and 12 months of pay to boot, but teachers' compensation is pretty low, especially when it's compared with other professions that require similar levels of education and training. Other public servants, like police officers and firefighters, also opt into a career that, despite its importance, leaves something to be desired in the salary department. But, shouldn't teachers and all public servants who work tirelessly and selflessly to better communities be able to afford to live in the area where they work? Here are a few things to think about.
  • Looking to Switch Careers? Coding May Be Your Answer
    Let's face it: sometimes a career can go stale. When you were 18, you might have been convinced that culinary school was your passion. Or maybe that near-decade of secondary education left you with a PhD that you couldn't care less about. Now, it seems, you might have an out: the tech industry. For those who have the drive and aptitude, a short training program might be the only thing separating you from an $68,000-a-year, entry-level salary – quite a bit better than the usual barista or waitstaff gigs that await folks who switch careers after leaving school.
  • When Being a Working Mom Is the Pits, Here's What You Need to Remember
    Working mothers do indeed have it all – if by "having it all," you mean having both sides of a double-edged sword. Women are still fighting for equal opportunity and equitable pay, so when you pile on the added pressure of balancing a career and family, there's enough guilt there to drive anyone mad … and sad. If you choose (or "choose") to return to work after having a baby, you're going to have to accept that your decision will have its ups and its downs. Here's what you need to know to get through those times when you start to doubt whether you're cut out to be a working mom.
  • 2016 PayScale College ROI Report Shows How Household Income Affects Earnings After Graduation
    The poor often stay poor – even if they're college graduates. This year, for the first time, PayScale's annual College ROI Report looks at how household income prior to attending college relates to income after graduation. In short, students who enter college from lower-income households don't see the same return on their tuition investment as students who start off with more money in their pockets.
  • #WednesdayWisdom: 5 Career Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs
    Whether you're trying to get promoted or start your own business or just figure out what you want to be when you grow up, sometimes there's no substitute for expert advice. And who better to advise you than some of the most successful entrepreneurs, productivity gurus, and businesspeople in the world? Probably you don't have the ability to call up Tim Ferriss or Sheryl Sandberg and ask them what you should do with your life, but you don't need to. Reading their thoughts on their own career trajectories and the lessons they learned along the way might be enough.
  • 3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You're Voting for Someone Else)
    Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.
  • Looking for a Job? Request an Uber
    Job hunting can get pretty monotonous: open up your computer, tweak your cover letter, change a bullet point, re-enter your job history, answer a couple of ridiculous questions, and then never hear back. It may seem like the system is set up to keep you from connecting with jobs that really suit you. But what if you could find job listings in places you'd never expect? What if they came to you in the midst of your day-to-day life? It's not as uncommon as you'd think.
  • Want to Negotiate Like a Pro? Use These 2 Unconventional Tactics
    Negotiating is no easy feat, especially when it involves your salary. However, as you know, the squeaky wheel gets the oil, so you better get squeaking if you want to up your salary. Here are a couple tricks of the trade to help you negotiate your way to a heftier paycheck, and do it confidently.
  • Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads
    Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.
  • Improve Your Focus by Learning to Ignore Things
    Has the following situation ever happened to you? You come home for the weekend with a ton of work that you need to get done before Monday. But, instead of waking up on Saturday morning and getting right to it, you decide you need to clean up a little first instead. By the time the weekend ends, not only is your work done, but your house is clean, your bills are paid, and your taxes are filed as well. In an effort to procrastinate, you actually ended up being highly productive. If this sounds at all familiar, then you know that attention doesn't always work exactly the way we'd like it to, and you'll be interested in some of these tips regarding focus and productivity. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Types of Job Stress, and What to Do About Them
    Work-related stress is all too common these days. Although stress levels, overall, have declined in the last few years, 60 percent of Americans surveyed by the American Psychological Association last year reported feeling stressed because of work. The problem is likely to continue as long as our modern culture of overwork persists.

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT