• How to Break 5 Career-Killing Habits
    Bad habits can be tough to break, but some are worth the effort. There are a few bad habits that could be causing you real professional harm without you even being aware of them. The first step is always identifying that there is a problem to solve. Let's take a look at a few of these career-killing habits and think about how to break them once and for all.
  • Is Amazon a 'Soulless, Dystopian Workplace'?
    This weekend, The New York Times published an exposé of working conditions at Amazon corporate. Amazonians, the article claims, are required to work long hours, in a data-driven environment that means constant performance evaluations; are expected to answer emails after midnight, sometimes at the prompting of follow-up texts; and are encouraged to inform on one another to management. Workers who don't come up to snuff allegedly are culled in layoffs that a former employee describes as "purposeful Darwinism" – some former employees claimed to have been pushed out after miscarriages or cancer. In an internal memo shortly after publication, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos responded, saying that the company described doesn't match his view of the organization and urging workers to come forward if they disagree.
  • What to Do When Your Job Keeps Growing and Growing...
    You know the deal. You're hired to do a job. That job comes with a job description or maybe even a contract that lists the responsibilities and duties assigned to you as said job holder. Next, you start to get comfortable with your new position. Soon, you're doing well, and before you know it, you start winning the respect of your co-workers and even your bosses. You're starting to feel pretty good about yourself, and this job – and that's usually right around the time when things start to change.
  • What We Can Learn From the Man Who Worked 50 Jobs in 50 States
    Finding meaning in one's career is one of the most important (and difficult) goals in a professional's working life. One man quit his cushy corporate career to set out on an epic cross-country voyage in which he held 50 hourly-wage jobs in 50 different states. Here's what he learned about work, meaning, and finding happiness in everyday jobs.
  • Erase These Words From Your LinkedIn Profile Right Now
    We all want to stand out. With more than 100 people on average applying to every job listing out there, it can be hard to make your on-par job skills and drive translate into much more than "I'm the ideal candidate. No, seriously. I'm perfect for this." The problem might be that you're trying too hard to have the perfect profile. In fact, it's so perfect, everyone's saying the exact same thing.
  • The Dress Code Debate: Are Mandals Affecting Your Performance?
    For the northern regions of this country, summer is an especially sacred time: by April, 50-degree weather is impetus for shorts and a t-shirt, whereas Los Angeles folks are still bundled up in the low-to-mid 70s. That said, when summer heat rolls around, it can be especially tempting to take advantage of those fashion mistakes that society will justify in July. If you're an employee of HP, however, they just became much more than a simple faux pas.
  • The Evolution of Gender-Based Career Quizzes
    The use of polarized language as a source of polarized ideas is nothing new. A classic case in point: The Quiz. Though the decision to have a career, a spouse, and/or children is clearly an individual and entirely subjective one, magazines throughout time have provided readers with the sometimes dangerous ability to define their identity, beliefs, and capabilities on the basis of arbitrary questions about life choices. Though such quizzes are silly and pointless when taken literally, comparing the gender-related values represented in contemporary women's magazine quizzes to those that showed up in publications from the 1950s is an interesting exercise that shows how views of women and their careers have shifted, and, for the most part, improved.
  • Research Says Your Bad Boss May Be Even More Damaging Than You Think
    We all know that a difficult boss can make life miserable, but new research shows that it can directly impact our career path – in fact, nearly half of us choose to leave our jobs because of our bosses. With all the toxicity a terrible manager yields, it's almost surprising that the number isn't even higher. Here are a few ways a difficult boss's effects extend beyond plain old unhappiness.
  • 5 Ways to Earn a Promotion Without Asking for One
    The old adage of "don't ask, don't get" is usually true when it comes to promotions and raises. If you don't let your manager know about your career goals, it's much less likely that you'll get to where you want to be. That said, workers often ask for promotions without stopping to consider if they're ready for them, or even if they've earned them. If you want to impress your boss and move up the corporate ladder, what you do is just as important as what you say. Here's how you can show your manager that you're ready – without ever saying a word.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Helicopter Parents Might Sabotage My Career
    Today's parents are pretty involved in their children's lives – often to a degree that seems excessive to those of us who grew up (or raised kids) in the '70s and '80s and were lucky if we knew we knew what a seatbelt was and that cheese didn't naturally form in pre-packaged single slices. Unfortunately, some of these helicopter parents don't let go once their kids graduate and join the work world. In this week's roundup, we hear from one such adult child, plus get some tips on what recruiters want to see on your resume and how to free yourself from negativity.
  • Your Cover Letter Might Be Costing You the Job
    Composing cover letters may be one of the most arduous aspects of applying for work, but it seems that they remain a necessary evil. The purpose of the cover letter is to introduce yourself to an organization in the context of the specific job to which you're applying. Cover letters are pointedly aimed toward each potential opportunity, whereas the rest of your application package might be similar to what you use for other job openings. A cover letter can make or break your application, so it's important to avoid certain common pitfalls in order to maximize its benefits.
  • 5 Reasons Employees Get Denied for Workers' Compensation
    Millions of Americans across the nation spend their days working in risky environments. Many workers push their physical limits every day, lifting, pushing, pulling, crouching, and crawling. Some are exposed to dangerous fumes, sharp objects, extreme heights, and harsh elements. Even in seemingly safe environments, employees can still be at risk of getting hurt. Even worse is that employees can put themselves at risk of not receiving appropriate compensation for their work-related injuries or illnesses.
  • 11 Ways Sleep Deprivation Is Ruining Your Career (and What to Do About It)
    Not getting enough restful sleep at night can do more than leave you irritable and groggy in the morning – it could be the reason you aren't advancing in your career, too. We'll take a look at 11 alarming ways sleep deprivation affects your brain over time, and what you can do to help remedy your insomnia so that it doesn't prevent you from achieving success in your career.
  • Why People Quit Their Dream Jobs
    With an insanely competitive interview process that can take four to six weeks, include up to eight rounds of interviews, and require responses to seemingly irrelevant questions such as, "How many trees are there in Washington state?," jobs at Amazon and other top tech employers are hard to get. The thought of someone who actually managed to snag a coveted spot with a dream company voluntarily choosing to relinquish said position might sound unfathomable. And yet many people do exactly that.
  • Do Successful People Really Use To-Do Lists?
    Many professionals feel that they couldn't live without their to-do lists. But, others feel they are an utter waste of time. Who has the extra minutes to spend planning out the order of operations when there are so many pressing issues that need to be attended to right away?
  • Jobs to Thrill Your Inner Child: Professional Mattress Jumper
    Using the bedroom mattress as a springboard to the stars is a quintessential childhood pastime. So much so, that the classic nursery song Five Little Monkeys has over 68 million hits on YouTube). As a career path for adults, however, mattress jumping "is not a game," according to Reuben Reynoso, a professional "mattress filler" who has made a career out of jumping on high-end mattresses for McRoskey Mattress Company in San Francisco's Potrero Hill. 
  • 5 Ways Working Moms and Dads Can Manage Their Households Like a CEO
    You're probably familiar with articles discussing how "mom skills" translate well in the workplace, especially when it comes to multitasking and prioritizing. However, you don’t hear much about the other way around. In this post, we'll take a look at five ways working parents can use their skills to keep a happy, orderly home.
  • No, Your Company Is Not a Family
    In a perfect world, we'd be honest with our employers and they with us. No worker would ever fudge their previous salary in order to get paid what they deserve; no hiring manager would claim to be out of budget, when in fact they were using it to secure a more in-demand skill set. Perhaps most important of all, no executive leader would ever tell this corporate fib: "Our company is just like family."
  • Women Over 65 Are Twice as Likely to Live in Poverty
    The gender wage gap is a persistent problem that's taking a long time to solve. The fact is that on average, women earn about 78 cents for each dollar brought in by men. And, new data suggest that this is having a significant effect on the state of women's finances in retirement.
  • The 10 Worst States for Student Loan Debt
    The class of 2015 is the most indebted to date, with student loan debt adding up to almost $68 billion total, including federal and private loans. The average graduate will have to pay back $35,000, according to data analysis by Edvisors, and the student loan default rate hovers around 13 to 14 percent. While politicians debate the best way to combat student loan debt, or mitigate its crippling effects, individual students must decide the best way to minimize their debt load. A recent WalletHub report reminds us that where students live can be an important factor in determining how much money they owe – and how quickly they're able to pay it off.