Google Chairman Manterrupts Female Tech Leader at SXSW to Mansplain Need for Diversity in Tech

"Mansplaining" is a term coined to describe the behavior of those men who have the need to explain what they believe are complex topics, in which they may or may not be well-versed, to women in a manner that is elementary enough for even a woman to understand. This very thing happened at SXSW this week, except this time, the "manterrupter" got called out publicly. Here's how it went down.

Why We Need to End the ‘All or Nothing’ Mentality About Working Mothers

If you're rolling your eyes at yet another working mother post, then you're the exact person who needs to be reading this the most. You, like most of society, sigh with annoyance that working moms are at it again, whining about how hard it is to succeed in a career because corporate America won't let you play with its toys. This article isn't here to prove you wrong or convince you that the Earth is flat -- its purpose is to ask that you step back from your conventional ideals and ask yourself, "Am I part of the problem, too?"

The Best Teams Have Women on Them

Working in groups is part of everyday life, both personally and professionally. For instance, a family must work as a unit to maintain an orderly household, and, likewise, professionals must utilize teamwork to accomplish company goals. So, what makes a group successful? One study found the secret ingredient: the more women, the better.

What’s in a Name? Discrimination, If You’re a College Student

Finding a college professor to mentor you may not be easy, unless you’re a white male or at least appear to be one by name alone. In a recent study of more than 6,500 professors at the top 250 schools, researchers found that professors were more likely to deny opportunities to women and minorities -- a bias that appears after only knowing a student's name. This is especially evident in faculty linked to more lucrative professions.

Why Aren’t More Women Choosing to Become Scientists?

Nearly 15 years have passed since the dawn of the 21st Century and still the field of science represents the dark ages in terms of gender equality. According to the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, in 2010, only 19.4 percent of doctoral degrees awarded in physics went to women and females represented a scant 17.6 percent of scientists employed as a physicist or astronomer. Why is it that women are so underrepresented in the science equation?