4 Tips for Finding a New Job After 40

After a lifetime of work, with one job flowing seamlessly into another, it might seem (in hindsight) like it was always easy to get a new gig. Unfortunately, the reality is that finding a new job can be harder as you get older. But not to fear! It's possible to find a new job, or even change careers completely, even as an older member of the workforce. Whether you're looking for a new challenge, or forced to look elsewhere after a layoff, there's no time like the present to make yourself into the best new employee your future boss ever had.

Ask These 3 Questions Before You Change Careers

Truer words have never been spoken about major career decisions than Kenny Rogers' famous lyrics, "You've got to know when to hold 'em. Know when to fold 'em." ... Before you make your final decision, you may want to consider these three things to ensure you're taking a leap of faith, and not a leap into impending doom.

3 Fast-Growing Green Jobs

Want to help the environment and your career at the same time? This Earth Day, do more than recycling your disposable coffee cup and heeding your environmentally conscious co-worker's admonition to think twice before you print out emails. Consider a career change to a green job, and give yourself a better shot at job security while saving the planet at the same time. You'd be surprised at how relatively little specialized experience or education you need to change to some (although of course not all) greener occupations.

#MondayMotivation: 5 People Who Found Success After 40

It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that career success strikes either early or not at all. The media loves stories about wunderkinds who make their mark (and their fortune) when they're barely old enough to rent a car. But your career doesn't stop when you turn 30, or 40, or 50. If you've been putting off following your dreams because you think it's too late to change careers, take inspiration from these famous folks – none of whom were a household name until middle age.

These 5 Jobs Only Require a Two-Year Degree and Are Perfect for a Mid-Career Change

If you were the same person you were when you first started out in your career, things wouldn't be so complicated. However, over time, you've matured as an individual and a professional, so it's only natural that your priorities shifted accordingly. As a result, you may have found that the career from which you thought you'd retire is now stifling and has become the bane of your existence. You're probably thinking that switching occupations mid-career isn't the wisest decision, but is staying in an unfulfilling, stagnant career until retirement the better option?

PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: Do You Feel Trapped in Your Career?

The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times over the course of their career, and spends less than five years at each job. Harder to figure out: how many times they change careers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't track it, and many changes are pretty subtle anyway, as career paths naturally evolve over time. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you need to make a big career change, plus resume rules you should stop breaking, and ways to beat burnout.

Shadow Your Way Into a New Job

If you are seriously considering a role or career change, job shadowing your prospective position could get you closest to the actual experience of being on the job. Job shadowing is a technique, not only useful for fresh graduates, but also for experienced employees who are pondering a career move. As the term suggests, it is an opportunity to shadow the incumbent to understand the skills, behavior, and aptitude required to perform the job.

The 10 Best Jobs for 2016 Are Mostly in Healthcare

What makes a job good? According to U.S. News and World Report, which just put out its list of The 100 Best Jobs for 2016, it's a mixture of factors like salary, occupational outlook, and work-life balance. There's also, as the editors point in out in the methodology, the all-important personal preference. That last factor is important, if impossible to weight: there's no point in contemplating a career change to a job you'll hate, no matter how many openings there are or what kind of salary you can expect to pull down once you make the transition. That said, one thing immediately becomes clear perusing U.S. News's list: if you want one of the top-ranked jobs, it will help if you're interested in entering a healthcare profession.

What’s Next? Teachers Who Change Careers Have Many Options

Teaching is difficult and interesting work. It can be wonderfully fulfilling and simultaneously almost unbearably frustrating and stressful. Generally, it's not the kids who make teachers want to move on to another profession. Rather, it's something about the system itself, the culture, that eventually adds up to be too much. Some teachers are driven away by the long hours and low pay, others feel they need to move on because of trying relationships with administrators or too much tension with parents. Others find the curriculum, or the accompanying standardized tests, too limiting and confining.

How to Work Up the Courage to Change Careers

So, you're ready to move on. Whether you've decided to change careers because you want a fresh challenge or because your industry doesn't feel like a good fit for you anymore, making this bold move can feel pretty scary. But ultimately, if you're really ready for a change, you'll probably be glad you did it. Still, it can be awfully difficult to take the plunge, even once you've decided it's definitely what you want to do. Here are some tips to help.