5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Leaving Your Company

Although it's something of a myth that Americans change jobs more than they used to, we do tend to move around quite a bit. In 2012, the average job tenure was just 4.6 years (keep in mind though that it was 3.7 years in 2002 and just 3.5 years in 1983). But, even though taking a new position and leaving an old one behind is a pretty common thing to do, it's not an action you should take too lightly, particularly if you're not just changing positions but actually leaving your organization. So, before you make your final decision and officially announce that you're moving on, ask yourself these questions.

How Your New Salary Negotiation Hero Scored a $30,000 Raise

In the post-recession economy, most people would count themselves lucky to get a 3 percent annual raise, or make a jump to a new job that gives them a couple of extra thousand dollars a year – even if that bump seems to disappear, once taxes come out. But not Claudia Telles. The 28-year-old quality specialist tells Business Insider that she managed to jump from a $41,000 annual salary to $72,000 – all without leaving her employer.

The Hidden Rewards of Job Hopping

What some call moving on, or even moving up, others negatively dub "job hopping." The decision to switch jobs relatively often is controversial. Will a company be willing to hire someone if their resume demonstrates a history of frequent job changes? There could be some downsides to switching jobs fairly often, but there are definitely some significant benefits as well. Let's take a closer look at the potential upsides.

Is a Big Salary Worth Being Miserable?

We grew up hearing that money doesn't buy happiness, but if the past few years of economic turmoil have proved anything, it's that poverty can buy misery. It's no wonder if many of us have now changed our tune when it comes to the actual price of the best things in life, etc. But, there's a big difference between putting up with a less-than-exciting job in order to pay the bills and enduring a truly terrible work experience. The question is, does any salary, no matter how huge, make an awful job worth it?

How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?

Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?

Hate Your New Job? Here’s What to Do Next

A few weeks into your new job and you’re already dragging your feet on the way to work. You just can’t come to terms with working at this organization and have a sinking feeling whenever you think of a work day. Is It OK to just quit, or do you have to stick it out?