What Teachers Say About College and Career Readiness

EdSource, in partnership with the California Teachers Association (CTA), conducted an online survey to find out what teachers feel is the key to career and college readiness and success. The results spoke volumes about what we ought to be providing our next generation of workers, according to the people on the front lines, and about what these students are learning instead. Let's take a closer look.

Should You Apply to College? 5 Things to Consider

It’s fall and many young people are looking at those college applications and thinking “is college still a good idea?” It’s a relevant question considering the high cost of tuition and the student debt problem in America. It’s also an issue that spurred debate this past spring. Before you decide whether you should take the plunge, take these factors into consideration.

Goucher College: Goodbye SAT, Hello YouTube

College applications are a dreaded beast: prepping for, taking, and retaking the SAT or ACT, writing the clever and eloquent essay describing your 18 years on the planet thus far, begging teachers to write letters of recommendation, and then fretting over the final GPA on your transcripts. Now, imagine if all of that process was simply eliminated and instead of jumping through hoops, you made a video. No tests, no essays, no letters, no transcripts. That’s what one college is attempting to do.

Comedian John Oliver Skewers For-Profit Colleges

Sunday’s Last Week Tonight delivered a 16 minute tongue lashing directed at for-profit colleges and their role in the student debt crisis. The schools have been at the center of a congressional investigation and have been called into question by the media and the public for their recruiting tactics and student loan practices. Host John Oliver didn’t hold back in his recap of the situation.

Should Colleges Be Held Accountable for the Success of Students?

It’s been a year since the White House announced its plan for a new college rating system and most college presidents still don’t love it. The idea of being held accountable for the success of students doesn’t sit well with many administrators. Yet, with student debt mounting, full-time professors dwindling, and the cost of tuition skyrocketing, colleges may have to get comfortable with showing they’re worth it.

Court Upholds U. of Texas Affirmative Action Policy

Consideration of race in admissions will continue at the University of Texas per a federal appeals court ruling this week. In a 2-1 vote, the appeals court upheld an earlier district court ruling which found the school’s use of race as a supplemental factor in bringing together a diverse student population to be fair. However, the school's fight to keep affirmative action is not over.

Starbucks Offers Free Online College Classes to Employees

Want to get that bachelor's degree you’ve always wanted, but couldn’t afford? Become a barista. The Starbucks Corporation announced Monday that it's going to finance online degrees for employees via Arizona State University. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan, the first of its kind, will be available to U.S. Starbucks employees working at least 20 hours a week.

What’s in a Name? Discrimination, If You’re a College Student

Finding a college professor to mentor you may not be easy, unless you’re a white male or at least appear to be one by name alone. In a recent study of more than 6,500 professors at the top 250 schools, researchers found that professors were more likely to deny opportunities to women and minorities -- a bias that appears after only knowing a student's name. This is especially evident in faculty linked to more lucrative professions.

Top College Admissions Rates Have Fallen

The news about top colleges and universities accepting fewer and fewer applicants each year may be alarming, but it is also complicated. Instead of giving up, take critical look at how and why this is happening.