3 Ways a College Degree Is Worth Less for Poor Students

It's widely accepted that a college degree is a requirement for most high-earning jobs, despite the fact that all degrees are not created equal, and even graduating from a school whose alumni tend to earn the big bucks doesn't guarantee a large salary. There's also another factor to your post-graduate success that's beyond your control: how much money your family had when you were growing up. Here are just a few of the ways coming from a disadvantaged background can compromise the value of obtaining a college degree.

Don’t Believe the Hype: Most College Graduates Feel Their Degrees Were Worth the Cost

Alarmingly high rates of student loan debt have a lot of people wondering if a bachelor's degree is really worth its cost. Short answer: yes, as long as you pick the right college and the right degree. Sure, college is extremely expensive these days, but don't let that scare you away. Despite everything, there is still a tremendous amount of evidence to support the importance, and the benefits, of attaining a bachelor's. In most cases, it's still totally worth it. Here's why.

5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad

By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.

Is Capping Student Loans at $10K a Good Idea?

Recently, billionaire investor Mark Cuban declared that fixing the student debt crisis is the most important thing our government can do to restore the national economy. His idea: cap federal student loans at $10,000 per student, per year. Few would argue that student loan debt isn’t a problem of epic proportions, but Cuban’s explanation of the crisis and his solution resulted in mixed reactions.

Comedian John Oliver Skewers For-Profit Colleges

Sunday’s Last Week Tonight delivered a 16 minute tongue lashing directed at for-profit colleges and their role in the student debt crisis. The schools have been at the center of a congressional investigation and have been called into question by the media and the public for their recruiting tactics and student loan practices. Host John Oliver didn’t hold back in his recap of the situation.

Is Higher Education Worth the Cost? Fusion and PayScale Investigate

Student loan debt currently tops $1 trillion, and tuition and fees increase every year. In an era of persistent unemployment and declining real value of wages, a prospective student could be forgiven for wondering if it's worth it to go to college at all. Recently, Fusion, a TV and digital network aimed at Millennials, and PayScale examined the question of whether college is still a good investment.

American-Sized Student Loan Debt for Australians?

Australians have found themselves in the middle of a debate not unlike the ongoing dispute in the U.S. over the cost of higher education. This year, the Australian government unveiled a proposal that would allow universities to raise tuition without any regulatory restraints. Officials say the changes would make schools more competitive, but opponents believe college in Australia will become unaffordable.

Should Colleges Be Held Accountable for the Success of Students?

It’s been a year since the White House announced its plan for a new college rating system and most college presidents still don’t love it. The idea of being held accountable for the success of students doesn’t sit well with many administrators. Yet, with student debt mounting, full-time professors dwindling, and the cost of tuition skyrocketing, colleges may have to get comfortable with showing they’re worth it.

Wealthy College Presidents May Be the Reason You’re Broke [infographic]

A recent report released by the Institute for Policy Studies finds that student debt and low-wage faculty labor are rising faster at state universities with the highest-paid presidents. Usually those three hotly debated issues: student debt, increased use of part-time faculty, and inflated executive pay are discussed as separate issues, but researchers wondered if the three were related. What they found shows that all three are connected in ways worthy of a Charles Dickens novel.

College Choice: Substance Trumps Style for a Happy Life

Feeling pressured to gain acceptance to an elite college? Don’t. According to a new Gallup-Purdue University study, it’s not where you study that matters in life, but what happens while you’re there. Researchers surveyed 30,000 college graduates and found that a person’s overall well-being and engagement in their work after college has little to do with where they went to school, but rather is influenced by the formative experiences they had while they were there.