Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation

The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.

Should You Apply to College? 5 Things to Consider

It’s fall and many young people are looking at those college applications and thinking “is college still a good idea?” It’s a relevant question considering the high cost of tuition and the student debt problem in America. It’s also an issue that spurred debate this past spring. Before you decide whether you should take the plunge, take these factors into consideration.

Comedian John Oliver Skewers For-Profit Colleges

Sunday’s Last Week Tonight delivered a 16 minute tongue lashing directed at for-profit colleges and their role in the student debt crisis. The schools have been at the center of a congressional investigation and have been called into question by the media and the public for their recruiting tactics and student loan practices. Host John Oliver didn’t hold back in his recap of the situation.

American-Sized Student Loan Debt for Australians?

Australians have found themselves in the middle of a debate not unlike the ongoing dispute in the U.S. over the cost of higher education. This year, the Australian government unveiled a proposal that would allow universities to raise tuition without any regulatory restraints. Officials say the changes would make schools more competitive, but opponents believe college in Australia will become unaffordable.

College Choice: Substance Trumps Style for a Happy Life

Feeling pressured to gain acceptance to an elite college? Don’t. According to a new Gallup-Purdue University study, it’s not where you study that matters in life, but what happens while you’re there. Researchers surveyed 30,000 college graduates and found that a person’s overall well-being and engagement in their work after college has little to do with where they went to school, but rather is influenced by the formative experiences they had while they were there.