The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold

College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.

5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad

By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.

Why Studying the Humanities Isn’t a Death Sentence for Your Career

If you've noticed more sad poets than normal lately, it might be because of a spate of headlines announcing the death of the humanities in higher education. While PayScale applauds college students who make the smart fiscal choice to study STEM subjects and earn the bigger paychecks that they often provide, we don’t think that abandoning the humanities altogether is the answer. We recently sat down with Zachary First, the Managing Director of The Drucker Institute, to hear what somebody who is working to reshape the face of higher education in America thinks about this trend.

How Many Grads Have Jobs Related to Their Major?

A new study suggests the American workforce is remarkably over-educated and underemployed. The young adult workforce, this research claims, holds degrees, but works menial jobs that don't call for the skills they learned in college. Think the stereotypical liberal arts major serving up coffee or philosophy grad dressing storefront mannequins. But is that really the case?