Play These 5 Pranks at Work, and You’ll Be the April Fool

Ah, April Fools' Day: the day when some normally sensible professionals regress to high school students targeting a particularly reviled substitute teacher. It's bad enough that the entire internet now teems with fake ad campaigns and bogus products (although we did finally get that Tauntaun sleeping bag, at least). There's no need to compound your co-workers' misery with intra-office April Fools' pranks, as well.

5 Ways to Tell If the Corporate Culture Is Right for You … Before Accepting a Job Offer

Finding the right company is just as important as finding the right job. Far too many professionals take the first job offer thrown their way out of desperation and impulse, without considering whether the company is a good fit, culturally. That's like marrying someone after the first or second date without knowing anything about that person, other than what you gathered online. A little crazy, right? Unfortunately, what ends up happening is that these eager professionals quickly grow unhappy in their jobs after discovering that it wasn't love at first sight – and this, folks, is why there are so many unhappy and disgruntled workers in America.

Amazon to New York Times: ‘Stack of Negative Anecdotes’ Doesn’t Represent Amazon Culture

Two months ago, The New York Times ran a piece on working at Amazon that went on to become its most commented-on story so far, with 6,600 comments by the paper's count. The article depicted a workplace in which 80-hour weeks were common, and work-life balance in short supply. Famously, the reporters cited one former Amazonian who said, "Nearly every person I worked with, I saw cry at their desk." Now, Amazon is responding to that portrait, claiming that the stories included in the article were biased, or presented without context, and that they don't add up to an accurate picture of what it's like to work at Amazon.

Is Amazon a ‘Soulless, Dystopian Workplace’?

This weekend, The New York Times published an exposé of working conditions at Amazon corporate. Amazonians, the article claims, are required to work long hours, in a data-driven environment that means constant performance evaluations; are expected to answer emails after midnight, sometimes at the prompting of follow-up texts; and are encouraged to inform on one another to management. Workers who don't come up to snuff allegedly are culled in layoffs that a former employee describes as "purposeful Darwinism" – some former employees claimed to have been pushed out after miscarriages or cancer. In an internal memo shortly after publication, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos responded, saying that the company described doesn't match his view of the organization and urging workers to come forward if they disagree.

Here’s Why Your Office Is So Cold

If you're a woman and work in an office, you're probably longing for fall, and not because you enjoy autumnal fashion and Pumpkin Spice Lattes. No, for many of us, the end of summer will mean the end of freezing to death under the arctic blast of the office air conditioning. Before you roll your eyes, menfolks and other warm-blooded people, go put your hands in the freezer for a few minutes and then come back and try to type something. We'll wait. When you return, cast your eyes on the abstract of a recent study, published in the journal Climate Change and entitled Energy Consumption in Buildings and Female Thermal Demand, which demonstrates what many female office workers have been saying for years: the office thermostat is set with men in mind.

Early Career Success Guide: How to Get Along With the Boss

Chances are, by the time you start your first "real" job, you've had bosses before. But what was appropriate at the ice cream stand or landscaping gig might not be OK in your new office environment. Even if you've had tons of internships and lots of practice dealing with corporate culture, expect a learning curve when you begin your first professional job. Every company and manager is different. If you want to be a success, you'll need to learn how to adapt and communicate with your particular boss.