Depressed or Anxious? Blame the Gender Pay Gap

Women are 70 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and 83 percent of employed Americans consider this factor to be the number one barrier to workplace success, reports Diversity Woman. Discussions about why women are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety often focus on hormonal fluctuations or coping strategies. Now, new research suggests that part of the problem may actually be financial in nature.

Depression and Retirement Often Go Hand in Hand, Especially for Men

For many of us, retirement inspires mixed feelings. Of course it's an interesting phase of life to ponder. But, fantasizing about how lovely it will be to wake up without an alarm clock, or to retire the suits and ties and dress shoes to the back of the closet only to be worn again on special occasions, is really only the beginning. Pretty soon we start to wonder: what would I even do with all that free time?

How to Fight Seasonal Affective Disorder

Cold dark days and colder darker nights bring on the "winter blues" or SAD (seasonal affective disorder) for an estimated 25 million Americans every year. While it's somewhat of a mystery, the condition is serious and manifests a lot like depression, which luckily means there are some established ways to treat it. Before winter gets its icy grip on you, prepare yourself to fight off SAD with a few simple tips.

When Job Hunting Turns You Into an Angry Neckbeard

Job hunting is the worst, and anyone who says otherwise is probably one of those weirdos who love dating. It's a high-pressure situation, with a hefty dose of artificiality, and it demands that you display your best self in a very short period of time. Also, unlike the hunt for the perfect relationship, job searching has high stakes in the immediate future: most of us just do not have the wherewithal to bank the six months of expenses that financial experts tell us we should have. It's no wonder, then, that job seekers sometimes experience psychological fallout from their search, up to and including clinical depression. This makes it harder to get a job. It's difficult to put on a sunny face and look like a person hiring managers should consider when you're feeling, as one Redditor recent put it, "like an angry neckbeard."

Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression

Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.

PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: Draft Your Team Like an NFL Manager, How Depression Affects Your Job, and Answering the Second Most-Awkward Interview Question

Even if you're not into sports, you can learn a lot about leadership -- good and bad -- from watching the managers of professional sports teams. It all comes down to using data to help you make better decisions. Plus, also in this week's roundup: how depression affects working memory, and thus our productivity, and the best way to answer, "Why are you looking for a new job?"

7 Tactics to Avoid the ‘Overqualified’ Blues

Until now, you may have believed that it was a good thing to have lots of skills and an over-abundance of job experience. After all, you've worked hard over the years to build that portfolio and to earn every line on your resume. In the sometimes-backwards world of the job hunt, that gold-plated resume may actually be sending up red flags to your prospective employer.