What’s the Best Way to Promote Diversity?

We stand on the edge of murky waters: a white millennial male writing about diversity in the workplace. But it doesn't take an advanced degree in sociology to determine that some approaches simply aren't going to work. One curious case comes from a recent story in the Washington Post, which reported about a presentation given to business managers at The New York Times. Apparently, those who failed to seek out minority candidates for hiring and promotion would be fired — or at the very least, strongly encouraged to leave. Is there something wrong with this?

How Samantha Bee Got Such a Diverse Writing Staff

The latest entry into the late-night talk show ring is none other than Daily Show alum Samantha Bee and her new show, Full Frontal. She's a remarkable newcomer for a few reasons. First, she's a woman in a sea of dudes behind desks (a literal representation of this was recently published by Vanity Fair). Secondly, she's created a writing staff that is atypical for comedy staffs — it's 50 percent female and 30 percent nonwhite. So how did she manage that? The answers could surprise you.

Diversity Talk Makes White Men Anxious, and Other Reasons Diversity Programs Fail

Diversity in the workplace has been proven to foster innovation and creativity and improve recruitment and retention, and diverse teams are better at solving problems than teams that aren't diverse. Despite all of this, a lot of companies aren't diversifying the way evidence would suggest that they should. Women in the Workplace, a joint study from LeanIn.org and McKinsey, found that women are underrepresented in senior leadership, and a 2014 analysis from Russell Reynolds found that more than 84 percent of board seats in the Fortune 250 are held by people who identify as white. Why aren't companies more diverse, given all we know about diversity's benefits?