Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression

Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.

What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job

Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.