Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less

Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.

5 Reasons to Start a Book Club at Work

We know a lot about our co-workers: what they like to eat and drink, what music they’re into, and what they like to read. In fact, these interests often become the basis of our workplace conversations. Maker of trendy eyewear Warby Parker noted a shared passion for reading amongst employees and decided to make book clubs an official component of the company’s culture. It’s been a win for everyone involved. Here’s why.

Happy Workers Love Their Mothers

Did you know your mother follows you to work? Well, she may not actually be following you to your desk, but her influence does. A recent study found that mothers play a unique role in what kind of worker you become. It turns out that a strong relationship with your mom may cause you to be less focused on money, and more focused on finding meaning and purpose in what you do.

3 Memory Tricks to Become Smarter and More Productive

Improving our memory skills increases productivity at work and, in general, makes our lives a little easier. From remembering where we stashed our keys to remembering the boss's detailed instructions, the following tips and tricks will make us work smarter and be more productive. How many of these are you familiar with?

Employees Prefer Prosocial Bonuses Over Cash

Everyone loves being appreciated at work and nothing says “we love you and hope you stay here forever” more than monetary rewards. According to new information, however, employers are moving toward prosocial bonuses – bonuses that you pass on to either coworkers or charity, rather than keeping for yourself. Do you feel more rewarded and appreciated when you receive the warm and fuzzy feeling of a good deed? Or is this just the next step up from a doughnut bonus?