Justin Trudeau and 5 Other Successful English Majors

On October 19, Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party won a decisive victory in the Canadian national election. The prime-minister designate assumes office in November, and has already started movement on his campaign promises, but even if you don't care about Canadian politics (or any politics) there are a few interesting things to note about Canada's next prime minister. For starters, liberal arts majors can rejoice, because Trudeau has, among other degrees, a bachelor's in English literature from McGill. There's an answer, the next time your parents ask you, "What are you going to do with that English degree?"

Why I Chose to Study English

If I had a dime for all the times someone questioned why I decided to study English, I'd probably have enough money to put me through law school. Jokes aside, I honestly can see where the confusion lies. My high school academic record reads like it belongs to a poster child pre-med student: 12 advanced placement courses including two years of calculus, an introductory statistics course, advanced biology, and physics. On top of all that, I attended one of the best STEM high schools in the nation, which, not incidentally, is also home to the best high school computer science program in the world.

5 High-Paying Jobs for English Majors

For today's prospective college students, the pressure is high to choose a STEM major, and set themselves up for a high-paying, in-demand occupation. There's just one problem: what if science and technology -- outside of the scope of speculative fiction -- genuinely don't excite you?

Best College ROIs by Major

PayScale just released the newest feature of our College ROI Report, a breakdown of which colleges provide the best ROI for specific families of majors. Now you can see which schools provide the best return on investment specifically for students who major in English and the Humanities, Business, Engineering, Computer Science and Political Science.

Jobs for English Majors: They Do Exist

The butt of every cocktail party joke – the English major. “Oh, that’s nice that you read Shakespeare. But, how does that get you a job?”

Well, it turns out that wordsmithing just might be the ticket in to today’s job market. According to a survey of HR professionals by global outplacement agency Challenger, Gray and Christmas and quoted in a New York Times article, “Young Workers: U Nd 2 Improve Ur Writing Skills,” the number one skill missing amongst entry-level job applicants is “writing skills.” Huh, sounds like that business degree may not do the trick for getting started in a new career.