How I Got My Dream Job: John Rizen, Magician

Magicians have been with us for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. Historians date the first usage of the word as early as the 14th century, and trace its etymological origins to the magus, a type of ancient Persian priest, and cognate maghdim, a Chaldean term for "wisdom and philosophy." Fast-forward a handful of centuries later, and the word's basic connotations still apply, at least to modern-day magician John Rizen, a Canadian-born magic master and mogul currently based in Vancouver, BC. For the past six years, Rizen had managed to carve out a career path doing what he loves, through hard work, self-defined hustle, and of course — and please forgive the mandatory pun — a little magic.

#WednesdayWisdom: 5 Career Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs

Whether you're trying to get promoted or start your own business or just figure out what you want to be when you grow up, sometimes there's no substitute for expert advice. And who better to advise you than some of the most successful entrepreneurs, productivity gurus, and businesspeople in the world? Probably you don't have the ability to call up Tim Ferriss or Sheryl Sandberg and ask them what you should do with your life, but you don't need to. Reading their thoughts on their own career trajectories and the lessons they learned along the way might be enough.

How I Got My Dream Job: Megan Baker, Senior Director of Program Management, FreeWheel

Meet Megan Baker, Senior Director at FreeWheel, a company that produces and manages the technology behind ad-supported content for some of the heaviest hitters in the television industry. (Clients include ABC, AOL, DIRECTV, ESPN, NBC Universal, Turner Broadcasting, and Viacom, to name just a few.) Drawing on the same work ethic and no-holds-barred gumption she used to put herself through NYU by balancing multiple jobs while maintaining a full course load, the Long Island native forged an impressive career spanning multiple industries before landing at her current gig at FreeWheel.

How I Got My Dream Job: Carlo Chalisea, Founder/Owner/Chef at Don Lucho’s Food Truck

Carlo Chalisea served Don Lucho's first sandwich off the grill himself in August of 2013. Now, two years later, the 30-year-old Seattle-based chef and entrepreneur is slanging his imaginative Rococo and Aji Amarillo-smothered Chicharron and Lomo Saltado creations to sandwich-loving Seattleites all over town as many as five days a week, and has trouble keeping up with demand even after hiring multiple employees. As one of the only authentic Peruvian food options in an area where the South American country’s cuisine is still largely unknown, the mobile sandwichera, which is named after Chalisea's father, has been growing apace with the local food truck scene as a whole, which exploded following the Seattle City Council’s unanimous vote to allow mobile food vendors to sell on public streets in 2011 (the state’s legalization of recreational marijuana in 2012 couldn’t have hurt things, either). At least some of the sandwich truck’s growth is the result of carving out a unique niche within the city’s larger mobile food community by way of standing gigs at local breweries, which have, like the trucks, been cropping up like wildfire in recent years. Along with this fortuitous strategy, the majority of his savings, and good old fashioned hard work, Chalisea credits Don Lucho’s success to innovative takes on his mom's family recipes, and a passionate dream to bring his Peruvian culture and cuisine to his hometown.