What We Can Learn From WalletHub’s Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses

Starting a new business is anything but easy. It requires fierce motivation, novel ideas, capital, not to mention some jumping-through-of-hoops to get all of your appropriate paperwork together. For women business leaders, the challenge may be even a little greater. In response to this, WalletHub recently compiled their list of 2016's Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses.

5 Inspiring Quotes From Young Female Entrepreneurs

"Anything you can do, I can do better. I can do anything better than you." There are two types of women in the world: those who find those lyrics conceited and arrogant, and those who see those words as fuel to catapult them towards their dreams. In this post, we'll cover five young female entrepreneurs who believed they could do anything better … and did. Here are some of their inspiring words about breaking down barriers and stereotypes to turn their little ideas into big, big business.

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.