Why Aren’t There More Women in Leadership Roles?

We all know that there are fewer women at the top than men, but it's still shocking to see the actual numbers. Only 22 of Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and only three – Indra Nooyi of PepsiCo, Ursula Burns of Xerox, and Lisa Su of Advanced Micro Devices – are women of color. Women aren't just underrepresented in business leadership roles, either; they also make up just 19 percent of the U.S. Congress and 26 percent of college presidents. Recently, the American Association of University Women released a report, Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership to examine why there are so few female leaders, and what we can do to close the gap.

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.

Are Women Better Leaders of Ethnically Diverse Countries?

Companies rightly want ethnically diverse teams, to reflect the population of the countries that make up their customer base. But governing an ethnically diverse country is not without its challenges. A new study takes a look at the role of gender in successful leadership, and finds that the countries that pull off both economic success and diversity all have one variable in common: a female head of state.

Make Your Career Dreams a Reality; These 5 Famous Moms Did

Working Mother magazine recently published an article that highlighted the inspiring stories of 25 celebrity mothers who chose to reinvent themselves mid-career to pursue new endeavors, which proved to be just as inspiring as they are prosperous. Read on to see how reinvention isn’t just for the rich and famous, it can also be your reality, too.

Big Banking Is a Man’s Job (or So the Numbers Say)

Women have struggled for equality in the corporate world for decades now, but gender inequalities still exist in a select few industries. We’ll take a look at how women are still vastly underrepresented in big banking and provide tips on how they, too, can have a successful career in such a male-dominated industry.