PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: Do Hiring Managers Really Care About Your GPA?

One of the hardest things about graduating is realizing that many of the things you were taught to focus on, while you were in school, aren't so important in the real world. For instance, while a so-so GPA can keep you from getting into grad school or even from graduating in the first place, it probably won't tank your chances at scoring a good job after graduation. Find out why, in this week's roundup.

New Grads, Here’s How to Build Your Career From Scratch

If you're a newly minted college graduate, you're probably going through a lot of different emotions right now – pride at having achieved your goals, relief at being done, and fear about what comes next. It's especially scary if you don't have any idea about that last part. The good news is that this year's college graduates are entering the hottest job market for grads in years, with employers expected to hire 5 percent more graduates than last year. But that doesn't mean finding that all-important first job is easy.

Recently, we spoke via email with Amanda Augustine, career advice expert for TopResume, to get her advice on how the class of 2016 can boost their chances of post-graduation success.

The 4 Best Ways to Help a Graduating Student With the Job Hunt

We've all heard the phrase, "There's light at the end of the tunnel" in one variant or another. The older that we get, the more we're able to reflect back on all the pinpoints of light we've gazed upon as various phases of our lives came to a culmination. Whether it was that feeling of satisfaction you had after completing the chores your parents assigned or acing a test after studying for weeks, arriving at that moment when you come out of figurative darkness is a wonderful thing.

For the typical college student, that light is always centered on the day they turn their credit hours into a formal degree. As graduation day draws near, so too do countless other thoughts that race through every soon-to-be graduate's mind — from finals and term papers to friendships and freedom. With all of these distractions, it's no wonder that it's difficult for many students to fathom the real-life challenges that are ahead.

Early Jobs of Presidential Candidates: Exotic Bird Cage Assembler, Babysitter, and More

Barack Obama once scooped ice cream at Baskin-Robbins. Gerald Ford was a "darned good" park ranger, in the words of his former supervisor. Ronald Reagan was an actor, and before that, a lifeguard who saved 77 lives over the course of seven summers. Early jobs teach us a lot, from work ethic and perseverance to budgeting and the value of education. Take a look at PayScale's Presidential First Jobs Report, and you'll see how the current crop of presidential candidates' early jobs prepared them for a run at the White House.

The Yelp Open Letter Makes Me Glad Social Media Arrived After I No Longer Knew Everything

In 2000, I worked for a startup. The name doesn't matter – like most startups, it didn't make it. The important thing, for the purposes of our story, is that I was a recent grad, awe-inspiringly entitled, fairly poor, and perhaps not very good at my job yet. The only thing I had going for me was that there was no social media, so there was no way for me to ruin my reputation with more than, say, three people. In this, I was much more fortunate than Talia Jane, the recently terminated Yelp/Eat24 employee. Jane's open letter to her CEO, which she published on Medium a few days ago, ignited the kind of internet firestorm that's generally reserved these days for arguing about Bernie Bros or Donald Trump. The question, of course, is what to make of her letter and its aftermath. Is she an entitled whippersnapper who doesn't know how to sacrifice, or a voice of her generation pointing out systemic unfairness ... and getting punished for it?

Why You Should Negotiate Salary, Even at Your First Job

"Your starting salary at the first company you work for is always going to suck." I can't exactly cite this quote to anyone in particular since I've heard it too many times to recall the original source. Point being, I was under the impression that my starting salary at my first job was going to be subpar. Yet, I realize now after checking out Payscale's Salary Negotiation Guide that being complacent about a low salary when I enter the workforce can really hurt my chances of earning more in the long run, as it is hurting lots of young people starting out in their careers today.

Early Career Success Guide: How to Use Data to Get Your Dream Job

A long time ago, when I was a newly minted job seeker, a school friend and I sat down to talk about our job prospects – and how much we thought we should be paid. "I'm figuring on $60,000 a year to start," she said. When I asked how she came to that number, she replied, "Well, that's about how much I think I need to pay off my loans and live in the manner to which I'd like to become accustomed." Needless to say, her first administrative assistant job, way back in the year (intentional mumbling to obscure my age), did not come through the way she'd hoped, in terms of pay.