5 Fast-Growing Flexible Jobs You Didn’t Know About

Some jobs lend themselves to flexible arrangements (like telecommuting, part-time, or temporary work) more than others. If you're a medical transcriptionist, a customer service representative, or a graphic designer, you probably already know that your occupation translates well to working from home, for example. But what about jobs that seemingly require a physical presence, whether it's in the classroom or the operating room? Don't be so fast to assume that working from home, on a full- or part-time basis, is out of the question. FlexJobs' latest list, 25 High-Potential Flexible Jobs for 2016, shows that many jobs provide opportunities to earn money while skipping the commute – at least some of the time.

The Top 20 Companies for Work-at-Home Jobs

Working from home saves commuting time and the cash you'd spend getting to work, and keeping yourself fed and caffeinated while you're there. It's also a pretty good deal for companies, who get employee loyalty for no cost and might even see some productivity gains in the bargain. But not every company is on board with allowing employees to work at home. If you want to work remotely, you have to find the employers are OK with it.

3 Ways Flextime Could Hurt Your Career

It's the new American dream: work full-time, with benefits, but from home -- at least part of the time. But flextime gigs aren't always all they're cracked up to be. Before you assume that your flexible work schedule is the answer to all your work-life balance problems, here's what to look at.

Could Telecommuting Solve the Gender Wage Gap?

Hold on to your pearls, Donna Reed. Gone are the days of women staying home to clean house and cook a roast while their men head to the office. A recent study conducted by the Pew Research Center showing that women make up 40 percent of the household breadwinners. What does this mean for the gender wage gap?