5 Steps Millennials Can Take to Advance Their Career

Keep your chin up, millennials. It's always been tough to land a good job.

Over the weekend, LinkedIn's Campus Editor Justin Chormicle penned a column titled Millennials Face Toughest Economy Since Great Depression. In the piece, Chormicle explores a report recently released by the New York City Comptroller's Office, which explains "how the lack of high-paying jobs, decline in wages, and increasing debt are severely hurting millennials when it comes to achieving the lifestyles and financial stability that previous generations experienced."

Deloitte Survey: Millennials Want Business to Focus on People

In less than 10 years, millennials are expected to make up about 75 percent of the workforce. They are already the majority – millennials are currently the largest generation in the U.S. labor force. As a result, some organizations are wisely deciding that it might be in their best interest to get to know this group a little bit better. Understanding how millennials view themselves, their futures, and the current career landscape can help both workers and organizations find ways to accommodate and maximize the power of this dynamic generation of workers. If you are a millennial, it's interesting to think about how your generation is currently being characterized and understood.

Are Millennials Changing the Culture of Work?

What the boss says, goes. Don't put anything online that you wouldn't print out and hang over your desk. Don't expect a free lunch, or a fast promotion, and always remember: your mama doesn't work here.

Those are the old rules of corporate culture, and most of us – especially if we were born before ubiquitous internet – agree that they're still the smart way to go. After all, what is etiquette, but a way to keep from driving our neighbors crazy, whether those neighbors live across a driveway or on the other side of a cubicle wall?

Best Cities for Gen Y Jobs

Did you know that Gen Y workers are now the most prevalent generation in the workforce today? Once known as the "lazy and entitled" generation, Gen Yers (or millennials) have trickled into the business world as employees and entrepreneurs and have revolutionized business as we know it – inviting a more transparent, laid-back, and tech-savvy work culture. Now that more Gen Y workers and business owners are in the business world now, it's no surprise, then, that the workplace is also adapting to accommodate the likings of millennials.

How I Got My Dream Job: Carlo Chalisea, Founder/Owner/Chef at Don Lucho’s Food Truck

Carlo Chalisea served Don Lucho's first sandwich off the grill himself in August of 2013. Now, two years later, the 30-year-old Seattle-based chef and entrepreneur is slanging his imaginative Rococo and Aji Amarillo-smothered Chicharron and Lomo Saltado creations to sandwich-loving Seattleites all over town as many as five days a week, and has trouble keeping up with demand even after hiring multiple employees. As one of the only authentic Peruvian food options in an area where the South American country’s cuisine is still largely unknown, the mobile sandwichera, which is named after Chalisea's father, has been growing apace with the local food truck scene as a whole, which exploded following the Seattle City Council’s unanimous vote to allow mobile food vendors to sell on public streets in 2011 (the state’s legalization of recreational marijuana in 2012 couldn’t have hurt things, either). At least some of the sandwich truck’s growth is the result of carving out a unique niche within the city’s larger mobile food community by way of standing gigs at local breweries, which have, like the trucks, been cropping up like wildfire in recent years. Along with this fortuitous strategy, the majority of his savings, and good old fashioned hard work, Chalisea credits Don Lucho’s success to innovative takes on his mom's family recipes, and a passionate dream to bring his Peruvian culture and cuisine to his hometown.

When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom

The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.

3 Things You Don’t Know About Negotiating Salary

To compile the recently issued Salary Negotiation Guide, PayScale asked 31,000 people whether they'd ever negotiated their salary. Fifty-seven percent said they had not. Given that not negotiating salary can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime -- and that 75 percent of people who ask get at least some kind of salary bump -- it obviously makes sense to hit the bargaining table before you accept a new job offer or let your annual review go by without initiating a discussion about money. Still reluctant? Arm yourself with the facts.