When You Are the Minority at Work

It's the first day of work and you're meeting with your new team; while it doesn't immediately strike you at first, you realize soon enough that perhaps you are the only person of color, the only man, the only woman, or the only person of a different faith in the room. It's not an easy start, but you will be able to make it work. Here are a few ways you can avoid isolation and any preconceived biases toward you and your efforts.

Everyone Needs Work-Life Balance, Not Just Women

A national conversation around the issue of work-life balance has really taken root lately, and it has everyone talking about what can be done to better things moving forward. However, when we think about work-life balance, we should be mindful that it's an important issue for all adults – not just women. Here are some things to think about.

The Best #DistractinglySexy Tweets

After Nobel Prize winner Sir Tim Hunt made headlines with a long, public and shockingly sexist diatribe about why he thought women were more of a distraction than a benefit in labs, hundreds of female scientists have taken to Twitter to call him out on his comments. These female STEM workers are posting photos of themselves at work, decked out in their daily uniforms of lab coats, hazmat suits, hairnets and goggles, with the hashtag #DistractinglySexy

The Best Teams Have Women on Them

Working in groups is part of everyday life, both personally and professionally. For instance, a family must work as a unit to maintain an orderly household, and, likewise, professionals must utilize teamwork to accomplish company goals. So, what makes a group successful? One study found the secret ingredient: the more women, the better.

What’s in a Name? Discrimination, If You’re a College Student

Finding a college professor to mentor you may not be easy, unless you’re a white male or at least appear to be one by name alone. In a recent study of more than 6,500 professors at the top 250 schools, researchers found that professors were more likely to deny opportunities to women and minorities -- a bias that appears after only knowing a student's name. This is especially evident in faculty linked to more lucrative professions.

Addressing a Critique of the PayScale Gender Wage Gap Study

A contributor to Skepchick.org wrote an opinion piece questioning the methodology of the recently released PayScale Gender Wage Gap report. In her blog post, titled “For-Profit Wage Comparison Website Overturns Feminist Dogma. Or Not.”, Jamie Bernstein brings up several points of contention about how we arrived at our main conclusion that the wage gap is much narrower than the oft quoted 80 cents to the dollar. We regularly receive questions about our gender wage studies as our findings do not conform to the wage gaps regularly touted. We welcome these questions because it gives us an opportunity to provide insight into the interesting trends that our data reveals.