Introducing #RestingBizFace

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You’re not bitchy. You’re busy. But try to explain that to (some of) your coworkers, who insist on treating a serious expression like a snarl.

This isn’t unique to the workplace, of course. Just ask …

Why Aren’t There More Women in Leadership Roles?

We all know that there are fewer women at the top than men, but it's still shocking to see the actual numbers. Only 22 of Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and only three – Indra Nooyi of PepsiCo, Ursula Burns of Xerox, and Lisa Su of Advanced Micro Devices – are women of color. Women aren't just underrepresented in business leadership roles, either; they also make up just 19 percent of the U.S. Congress and 26 percent of college presidents. Recently, the American Association of University Women released a report, Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership to examine why there are so few female leaders, and what we can do to close the gap.

4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers

It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.

5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem

How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.