Could Sheryl Sandberg Dress Like Mark Zuckerberg and Succeed?

Recently, a London receptionist made headlines when she challenged her temp company, which demanded that she wear two- to four-inch heels as part of a "formal dress code." If you're reading this in the U.S., and think something like that could never happen to you, think again: generally speaking, in most states it's legal for employers to impose one dress code on women and another on men, as long as it doesn't require more formal attire from one gender.

Dress codes are one thing, but even those of us who are lucky enough to work in places where the policy is something along the lines of, "Please don't come to work naked," can't escape the added pressure professional women face to look "groomed" – in other words, to wear makeup, to blow-dry their hair, and in many cases, yes, to wear high heels. In a recent column in The Huffington Post, Emily Peck invites us to consider, for example, the difference between the day-to-day attire of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

How Robin Wright Asked for (and Got) the Same Pay as Kevin Spacey on ‘House of Cards’

For the first three seasons of Netflix's hit political thriller/soap opera House of Cards, Kevin Spacey earned more than Robin Wright – about $80,000 more per episode, according to The Huffington Post. When the show began, that might have made sense. Spacey, after all, started off as an Oscar winner, whereas Wright had been largely out of the spotlight for several years. Then, however, the Emmy nominations started rolling in, for Wright as well as Spacey. What would Claire Underwood do?

Google Proposes 13 New Emojis for Gender Equality

Take a look at your emojis for a moment. Can you find one that looks like a woman with a career? You won't find a businesswoman, a scientist, a doctor, or even a female graduate wearing a mortarboard. In fact, the recognizably female emojis are retrograde in the extreme: there's a bride, and a princess, and a dancer – just about the only one that could be representing a profession.

Why is this important? Because emojis are everywhere, and far from being without impact on our professional lives, even if we never use them at work. The lack of female professional emoijis matters for the same reason that it matters that the average crowd scene in a movie is only 17 percent female; because if girls don't grow up seeing women succeeding in professional life, it's hard to imagine themselves doing the same. Now, four Google employees have proposed expanding emojis to include 13 new images – all depicting women working at jobs.

6 Important Facts About Women and Salary Negotiation

Why do women earn less money than men – and how much less do they really make? When it comes to the gender pay gap, nothing is off-limits for debate. In particular, critics who say that the gender pay gap is much smaller than 77 cents on the dollar argue that women's choice has a lot to do with why they earn less than men. They claim that women's lower earnings is not so much a pay gap, but a wage gap – and if women don't negotiate salary, for instance, then why worry about their lower earnings?