The Perception Gap: Women Half As Likely to Believe Women and Men Have Equal Opportunities in the Workplace

By now, everybody has heard about the gender pay gap. Women in the workforce don't earn as much as men, whether you're comparing overall earnings or comparing men and women working in the same jobs. But despite the data, debates still rage on in the media about whether gender inequity in the workplace is real. A new report from PayScale illustrates just how strongly this inequity is felt by women. Based on a sample size of over 140,000 employees taking the PayScale Salary Survey, 67 percent of men say there is equal opportunity for men and women in most workplaces, while only 38 percent of women say the same. This perception gap is even wider in the tech industry despite widespread media coverage of tech's gender problem.

What’s in a Name? Discrimination, If You’re a College Student

Finding a college professor to mentor you may not be easy, unless you’re a white male or at least appear to be one by name alone. In a recent study of more than 6,500 professors at the top 250 schools, researchers found that professors were more likely to deny opportunities to women and minorities -- a bias that appears after only knowing a student's name. This is especially evident in faculty linked to more lucrative professions.