The 5 Highest Paying Jobs In Healthcare

high-paying healthcare jobs
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Want a secure job in a growing industry? A healthcare job might be for you. Even during the recession, healthcare continued to add jobs.

Of course, not all healthcare jobs are created equal when it comes to …

The 5 Best and 5 Worst States for Nurses

If you're about to graduate from college and get your nursing license, you might be looking forward to starting your career with mixed feelings. On the one hand, nursing careers pay well and offer low rates of unemployment; on the other, getting started can be a struggle. It can be hard to get the minimum two or three years of experience that many employers look for in a new hire.

With this in mind, WalletHub recently evaluated all 50 states and the District of Columbia to identify the best and worst states for nurses – especially new nurses – in the U.S.

5 Things You Don’t Know About Nurses

If your picture of nursing and nurses was formed by watching medical dramas on TV, you probably wouldn't recognize a real Registered Nurse. Actual nurses do not flirt with doctors, wear World War II-era nursing caps, or spend the bulk of their day fluffing pillows and providing refreshments. They're highly skilled and rigorously educated professionals, and if you're ever in the hospital, they're the part of the medical team that will be most involved, on a daily basis, in getting you on the road to recovery.

The 10 Best Jobs for 2016 Are Mostly in Healthcare

What makes a job good? According to U.S. News and World Report, which just put out its list of The 100 Best Jobs for 2016, it's a mixture of factors like salary, occupational outlook, and work-life balance. There's also, as the editors point in out in the methodology, the all-important personal preference. That last factor is important, if impossible to weight: there's no point in contemplating a career change to a job you'll hate, no matter how many openings there are or what kind of salary you can expect to pull down once you make the transition. That said, one thing immediately becomes clear perusing U.S. News's list: if you want one of the top-ranked jobs, it will help if you're interested in entering a healthcare profession.

#College2Career: Kelly Eagen on Why College Major Isn’t Career Destiny

Choosing a major is invested with a mythic kind of importance, as if it were the first step on the path to inevitable career success or failure. But, if that were the case, every pre-law student student would go on to be a lawyer, and every English major would either write the Great American Novel or go on to live, penniless, in a garret. The actual truth is that while choice of major is important, it's not the end-all, be-all of career prep during college. PayScale's College Salary Report offers the information prospective students need to pick the right major, program, and school for their particular goals and needs; stories like this one offer perspective on how to use that information.

The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs

Does your job make the world a better place? Some professions are more likely to answer "yes" to that question than others – and which ones might surprise you. PayScale's report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations have high meaning, and which make workers feel like their job is hurting the world more than helping. If you're thinking about changing careers, or just want to see how your job stacks up, this report is for you.

Low Stress, High Pay? These 3 Low-Pressure Jobs Can Pay $70k or More per Year

It's common to think of stress and pay as a tradeoff. For example, surgeons and air traffic controllers pull down the big bucks because their work is not only beneficial to society, but potentially tough on the cortisol levels of the job-holder. We don't care how good you are at managing stress: if your job involves rebuilding the human body or landing several tons of steel and jet fuel, you're going to feel the pressure. But not every high-paying gig demands such sacrifices.

If More Women Do ‘Male’ Jobs, Will Pay Equalize?

There are a lot of theories about why women still make less than men. Some experts hold that the problem is institutional sexism, others that women don't speak up enough and ask for what they want. PayScale's own report found that women are paid less, in part, because they choose work that gives back to society, instead of their own bottom line. The question, of course, is what we can do to reverse the trend, and compensate men, women -- and "male" and "female" professions -- fairly.

5 Healthcare Jobs That Don’t Require a 4-Year Degree

Over half of the occupations expected to grow by 30 percent or more over the next decade are healthcare professions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook. Even more significantly for folks without a lot of time or money to devote to retraining, some of them don't require a bachelor's degree for entry. A few are available to folks who only have a high school diploma.

Receptionist Careers – Medical Receptionist Job Description

Name: D.Vega
Job Title:
Receptionist
Years of Experience:
2
Where:
Tacoma, WA
Education:
College Student
Salary: See the PayScale Research Center for the median salary for medical receptionist jobs.

Receptionist Careers – Medical Receptionist Job Description

D. Vega is a receptionist for a medical facility. As a college student, the job has turned out to be especially valuable for gaining professional skills. In this interview, you'll read about the job description for medical receptionist, including what the duties of a receptionist are and what it's like to work in a rehabilitation center. You'll also find some great advice and stories that would be valuable to anyone working as a receptionist. What are lead medical receptionist job duties? The steps required to be promoted are explored. Learn why a positive attitude and love of learning are essential to this job.

PayScale: What is the job description of medical receptionist?

As a receptionist of a rehabilitation center I am the gate keeper to the company. The facility I work at provides short-term rehabilitation and long-term care services. My first priority is insuring the safety of residents by knowing their comings and goings. Each day when I arrive I check for new residents and created a file for them, which includes their medical status, contacts, special requests and coding. Once the file is complete it is locked in a secure file cabinet, which can only be accessed by authorized personnel. Then I check to see if there are enough supplies in the office and submit a request for more at month’s end. Next I will create administrative packets, so they are ready for distribution. There are two types of administrative packets, Human Resources and Residential. I also answer the phones and direct calls to the appropriate parties. It’s important to respond to every call and not let it go to voice mail. Periodically, there are requests for a tour of the facility. When leaving the reception area I will secure the front by locking up, forward calls to the nurses station and proceed to show prospective families around. Since the facility is open and designed like a home, I am able to interact with residents throughout the evening. Coffee and hot chocolate is always available and taking time to sit and share with families is one of the best parts of my job.