Here’s How Switching Jobs Can Really Cost You

Are things starting to feel stale at the office? If you're feeling unfulfilled in your work and daydreaming about different companies, you're not alone. According to Gallup, 51 percent of currently employed Americans are considering a new job. But before you send in your two weeks' — or even call a recruiter — you should weigh the downsides of leaving that desk. They may surprise you.

How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?

Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?

Is Job Hopping Finally OK?

Career advice varies widely, depending on who's giving it, but most experts agree on one thing: if you can manage it, you're best off staying in one job for at least a few years. Change more often than that, the theory goes, and you're telling prospective employers that you're unreliable. But in this age of frequent layoffs and long-term unemployment, is there really still such a strong stigma against job hopping?

Job Hopping Is the New Normal

Gone are the days when workers toiled for the same company from graduation until retirement, heading off into their golden years with a watch and a pension. Today's workforce changes jobs more often than ever: one survey found that at least 21 percent of full-time workers plan on changing their jobs in 2014. According to some experts, that's just fine.