The 25 Most Unsatisfying Jobs In America

In a perfect world, everyone would work a meaningful job. We would all wake up every day excited to go to what would be our well paying jobs where we are changing the world for the better. Unfortunately, reality is …

The 25 Most Satisfying Jobs In America

Everybody wants to feel satisfied with their job. Being satisfied with your work is a benefit for both you and your company. When you’re happy with your job, you tend to produce your best work. It can also lend itself …

The 4 Cities Creating the Most White-Collar Jobs

The professional and business services industry remains a strong part of the U.S. economy, adding jobs even when other sectors are weak, and offering significantly higher wages than other service-providing industries. In a recent piece for Forbes, Joel Kotkin …

How to Tweet for the Queen (or Any Other Celebrity)

Nearly three in five millennials have a Twitter account. While the company may have reported less-than-stellar numbers in the last quarter, it's certainly a brand that Americans in 2016 are quite familiar with. And even if you aren't among of the scores of active users, some interesting new job opportunities may convince you to get familiar with the social media platform, namely: you could be tweeting for the Queen of England.

Why Don’t Americans Believe That Robots Are Coming for Their Jobs?

The concept of robot overlords taking control of mankind dates back long before Will Smith's 2004 magnum opus I, ROBOT, which is, incidentally, now the name of one of those automatic floor vacuums. In fact, stories of computers ruling humanity date back as early as the 1950s (as commenters who know their Asimov will no doubt point out). But these days, it really isn't science fiction. In fact, Wired reported a study by Oxford University researchers that estimated 47 percent of current jobs in the U.S. could very well be automated inside of the next 20 to 30 years. The scary part is that Americans actually agree for the most part with these findings — they're just in denial that they are the ones on the chopping block.

Why ‘Full Employment’ Isn’t the Whole Picture of the Job Market

In November, the unemployment rate officially hit 5 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the rate many economists use to mark "full employment." But as Nelson D. Schwartz wrote at The New York Times, "The slack that built up in the labor market after the recession ... has changed traditional calculations of how far unemployment can fall before the job market tightens and the risk of inflation rises." In other words, on economic or personal level, that 5 percent unemployment marker might not mean what it used to mean.

Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them

A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.

Managing Millennials? Focus on Improving 3 Key Work Skills

Earlier this month, SkillSurvey published the results of some extensive research into the merits of millennial job candidates. The survey observed 28,700 references for around 7,000 job candidates, the vast majority of whom were born after 1980. The conclusion? Millennials are "eager, dedicated people who score high on ethics and integrity." But they're not without their problems.

The Robots Are Coming! 5 Jobs That Will Be Replaced in the Future

If you're a working person, you probably already know that you're not indispensable. There's always someone coming up behind you on the ladder, with newer skills and lower salary expectations. In the future, however, you might not be competing solely with other humans. Jobs ranging from cleaning person to airline pilot could be taken over by robotics, reports Mashable, citing an Oxford Research prediction that 45 percent of U.S. jobs could be computer-automated by 2033.