How to Be More Charismatic

What does charisma have to do with career success? Just about everything. Even if you’re indisputably in charge at work, getting people to do what you want them to do is more complicated that simply pointing out that you sign …

PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: The Real Way to Become a Better Listener

If you've ever tried to up your listening game, you know it's harder than it seems. It's not a matter of simply cultivating interest in what the speaker is saying, or suppressing the tendency to wait for your chance to talk. This week's roundup includes insight into why you can't become a better listener, just by listening harder – plus, how to improve, the right way, and an explanation of why all those productivity hacks aren't helping you to get more done.

What We Can Learn From Pete Carroll: How to Explain a Bad Call on the Fly

The sound you heard yesterday was a cry of anguish going up in the PayScale offices, as the Seahawks lost the Super Bowl at the last possible moment. Offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell called a slant pass that resulted in quarterback Russell Wilson throwing an interception, giving the game to the Patriots ... and spurring a lot of not-even-Monday-morning quarterbacking by critics eager to point the finger at coach Pete Carroll. Carroll's response shows us a lot about how to handle bad calls in our own working life.

How to Give Negative Feedback

No one likes negative feedback -- either receiving it, or giving it. In fact, we might hate giving constructive criticism more than getting it; leadership development researchers Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman found that while 92 percent of respondents to a survey valued corrective feedback, most managers felt uncomfortable giving it. Comfort levels aside, it's obviously unlikely for performance to spontaneously improve, without direction from leaders. So what can you do, as a manager, to offer negative feedback that leads to positive results?

5 Tips for Managing an Introvert

Introverts sometimes get a bad rap in today's business world, portrayed alternately as antisocial types who can't work on teams or reclusive geniuses that are best used in moderation. In fact, successful teams are often a mixture of extroverts and introverts. The key to supporting your more inner-directed reports is understanding what makes them tick and how to give them the best shot at success, both for their own sake and that of the company.

In Praise of the Office Eeyore

Given their druthers, many would prefer to work with a moderately cheerful colleague, instead of someone who tends to see the dark side of a situation, but maybe they should reconsider. Studies suggest that our gloomier colleagues might have a valuable perspective to offer -- one that relentlessly positive types might not be able to duplicate.