Why You Really Need to Take a Lunch Break

Think that you can’t get out of your work slump because you don’t have enough time? Maybe you’re not tapping into the mid-day break we all have (but many of us neglect): lunchtime. There’s a half hour to an hour …

Having a Bad Day? Here Are 3 Ways to Help You Cope

It only takes one bad day to derail you for the entire workweek, and unfortunately, they seem to crop up at the most inopportune times, like when you have a million project deadlines and other stressful things going on. If you happen to be having "one of those days," then here are some ways you can change things around and make today a positive and productive one.

Is It Ever OK to Drink During Your Lunch Break?

The return of AMC's Mad Men for its final season brings about mixed feelings for a lot of viewers. There's some sadness that it's almost over, but it's also a lot of fun to reacquaint ourselves with the characters, and culture, we've come to love. One aspect of the show that seems to have really made an impression, even with folks who don't watch, is the drinking. In addition to introducing young people to old-timey cocktails like Manhattans and gimlets, the liquor fueled lifestyle of Mad Men left us in awe. For most of us, drinking during lunch is a rarity at best – a far cry from having wet bar in every office.

Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less

Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.