The Worst Cases of Resume Fakery Hiring Managers Have Ever Seen

In this job market, a lot of people might feel tempted to exaggerate their experience or credentials on their resumes in order to get ahead. But, lying on your resume is a bad idea – a very bad idea. You'll likely get caught, as hiring managers will seek to verify your claims. Even if by some miracle your lie slips past them, you'll reveal the truth when you start to do the job and your skill set doesn't line up the way it should. No matter how you cut it, outright lying on your resume is not recommended – but that doesn't stop people from trying.

Seriously, Do Not Lie About Your Salary as a Negotiation Tactic

While the best salary negotiation advice is to try not to divulge your salary history, or to push the hiring manager to state a range, many won't play along. That's because they know that the person who names a number first is at a disadvantage – and they'd prefer to be "Not It." This is supremely frustrating to a job seeker. You could be forgiven for thinking that the best thing to do would be to stretch the numbers a bit, when asked to name your most recent salary.

Padding Your Resume? 3 Reasons Why You Should Stop

Are you searching for that dream job, but aren't sure if you're qualified for a step up in your career? If you don't quite yet have all the skills a recruiter is looking for, you might be tempted to think about embellishing your resume or adding a few skills you don't actually have to your LinkedIn profile.

Need Better References? Hire a Professional Liar

You can't put a price on honesty, but lies come pretty cheap. For example, $59 a month will get you the services of one Timothy Green, whose company Paladin Deception Services offers professional fibbing for people ranging from hooky players to serial philanderers. But the real bulk of his business, Green says, comes from job seekers.